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Women with breast cancer often experience weight gain during and after treatment, significantly increasing risk for recurrence as well as all-cause mortality. Based on a growing body of evidence, meditative

Women with breast cancer often experience weight gain during and after treatment, significantly increasing risk for recurrence as well as all-cause mortality. Based on a growing body of evidence, meditative movement practices may be effective for weight management. First, we describe the effects of stress on factors associated with weight gain for breast cancer survivors. Then, a model is proposed that utilizes existing evidence to suggest how meditative movement supports behavioral, psychological, and neurohormonal changes that may explain weight loss.

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    Date Created
    • 2014-12-24
    Resource Type
  • Text
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    Identifier
    • Digital object identifier: 10.1177/2055102914565495
    • Identifier Type
      International standard serial number
      Identifier Value
      2055-1029
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    Larkey, L. K., Vega-López, S., Keller, C., Mcclain, D., Ainsworth, B., Ohri-Vachaspati, P., . . . Jeong, M. (2014). A biobehavioral model of weight loss associated with meditative movement practice among breast cancer survivors. Health Psychology Open, 1(1), 205510291456549. doi:10.1177/2055102914565495

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