Matching Items (22)

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Health and well-being benefits of spending time in forests: systematic review

Description

Background
Numerous studies have reported that spending time in nature is associated with the improvement of various health outcomes and well-being. This review evaluated the physical and psychological benefits of

Background
Numerous studies have reported that spending time in nature is associated with the improvement of various health outcomes and well-being. This review evaluated the physical and psychological benefits of a specific type of exposure to nature, forest therapy.
Method
A literature search was carried out using MEDLINE, PubMed, ScienceDirect, EMBASE, and ProQuest databases and manual searches from inception up to December 2016. Key words: “Forest” or “Shinrin -Yoku” or “Forest bath” AND “Health” or “Wellbeing”. The methodological quality of each randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was assessed according to the Cochrane risk of bias (ROB) tool.
Results
Six RCTs met the inclusion criteria. Participants’ ages ranged from 20 to 79 years. Sample size ranged from 18 to 99. Populations studied varied from young healthy university students to elderly people with chronic disease. Studies reported the positive impact of forest therapy on hypertension (n = 2), cardiac and pulmonary function (n = 1), immune function (n = 2), inflammation (n = 3), oxidative stress (n = 1), stress (n = 1), stress hormone (n = 1), anxiety (n = 1), depression (n = 2), and emotional response (n = 3). The quality of all studies included in this review had a high ROB.
Conclusion
Forest therapy may play an important role in health promotion and disease prevention. However, the lack of high-quality studies limits the strength of results, rendering the evidence insufficient to establish clinical practice guidelines for its use. More robust RCTs are warranted.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017-10-18

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Methods of Relaxation for Promoting Sleep in Patients Diagnosed with Cancer

Description

For this creative project, an instructional video on relaxation techniques was created. The relaxation techniques demonstrated were intended to help patients with comorbid cancer and sleep disturbance fall asleep with

For this creative project, an instructional video on relaxation techniques was created. The relaxation techniques demonstrated were intended to help patients with comorbid cancer and sleep disturbance fall asleep with greater ease. Based on a literature review, autogenic training and tai chi were chosen as the relaxation techniques to demonstrate in the video project. The literature review informed what components of autogenic training and tai chi should be included in the video. A patient with cancer was asked to participate in the making of the video. The patient was guided through autogenic training and tai chi. The patient provided feedback on her experience after completing each technique. The video also included background information on the two relaxation techniques. The completed video was presented to the director of Natural Medicine and Detox in Phoenix, AZ, a naturopathic physician, and a cancer survivor. These individuals provided feedback on what they liked about the video and what they thought needed improvement. The video was posted on YouTube as a resource for patients with cancer. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=04kYz1kSCaU

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

Developing and Pilot Testing Digital Storytelling Interventions to Promote HPV Vaccinations among Vietnamese American Adolescents

Description

Significance Background: Human papilloma virus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection, affecting 79 million Americans today and an additional 14 million Americans becoming infected with HPV each year.

Significance Background: Human papilloma virus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection, affecting 79 million Americans today and an additional 14 million Americans becoming infected with HPV each year. HPV infection may lead to the development of genital warts and several types of cancers including both cervical and oropharyngeal cancers. The promotion of currently available HPV vaccines is important to prevent HPV transmission and reduce the prevalence of the comorbidities associated with infection. Promotion to Vietnamese-Americans in particular is important because of the increased rates of cervical cancers seen in this population. As Vietnamese-American mothers often act as the primary healthcare decision maker for their children, they were chosen as the target population for this intervention. Purpose: This study aims to (1) develop personal digital stories about HPV and HPV vaccination among Vietnamese women with adolescent children who are vaccinated against HPV; and (2) share these stories with a group of Vietnamese American mothers and assess the effect of the stories in changing the attitudes, beliefs, and intention to vaccinate for HPV. Methods: This study used a two-step process to design, implement, and evaluate digital stories to improve Vietnamese mothers' attitudes, beliefs, and intention to vaccinate their adolescent children against HPV. The first step was a formative research design to develop the digital stories. The second step was quasi-experimental with a pre and posttest design to evaluate the effect of the stories. Results: The first phase has produced two digital stories which will be screened recruitment has been completed for phase two. Content analysis showed the importance of community resources, the desire to protect children, a history of familial and/or personal cancer, concerns about side effects, and the influence of healthcare providers as themes in both stories. Recruitment efforts are underway to recruit eligible Vietnamese mothers to assess the effect of these stories. Data collection is ongoing. Conclusions and lessons learned: The project has yielded two digital stories and recruitment for phase two is underway. This project has been successful in obtaining IRB approval, recruiting phase one participants, holding a digital storytelling workshop, designing the phase two survey, and beginning data collection efforts. The phase two recruitment has been challenging and will necessitate a change in strategy to find participants.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017-05

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Music Therapy and Its Effects on Anxiety and Depression in Older Adults Living in Independent Living Homes

Description

Research supports that music therapy can be used in multiple aspects of care for patients living within different environments. There is a gap in the literature when it comes to

Research supports that music therapy can be used in multiple aspects of care for patients living within different environments. There is a gap in the literature when it comes to the impact of music sessions for older adults who do not have a diagnosed disease, therefore this study analyzes this population specifically. This study examines music therapy and its effects on anxiety and depression in adults aged 65 or older living in independent living homes. The adults participated in a mixed-methods study over the span of one month examining music as an intervention to decrease anxiety and depression. Each subject consented into the study, completed a demographic survey, answered open-ended questions regarding their experience with anxiety/sadness and ways to cope, as well as Profile of Moods Scale (POMS) during the first session. On the last week of the study, the participants were asked to fill out the same POMS scale to evaluate whether music influenced anxiety and depression. There was limited evidence found in this study to support the use of music therapy as an intervention to decrease anxiety and depression in adults over the age of 65.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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Measuring the Effects of Martial Arts and ADHD

Description

The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of a four-week martial arts program implemented once a week on children diagnosed with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) between the

The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of a four-week martial arts program implemented once a week on children diagnosed with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) between the ages of four and seven. This was a single group, pre- and post-intervention assessment pilot study. The total sample of the study was four children (n=4) and the martial arts classes were based on the Duke Kenpo Little Tiger Program by Jonathan Duke of Mesa, Arizona. Change was measured using the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function, 2nd edition (BRIEF-2) parental form and participants were encouraged to record at-home practice. Data were collected pre-intervention and four weeks afterwards. Limitations included small sample size, measurement limitation (e.g., ceiling effect), data based on parental report, a short intervention period, potential instructor bias, and uneven gender distribution. Given the small sample size (n=4), this study did not complete statistical analysis and alternatively described the changing patterns of the participant's ADHD symptoms from BRIEF-2 measures pre and post intervention. The results of this study could not generate the power to detect significance to state significant implications. However, the trends suggested that some participants declined in executive function in certain areas (e.g., task-monitoring and planning) and improved in other areas (e.g., working memory and organization of materials). All participants demonstrated improvement within the cognitive (CRI) scale of the BRIEF-2 and future studies may explore the potential for martial arts interventions in children under seven as a means to improve the cognitive aspect of executive function development. In addition, future studies may consider exploring the role of frequency versus time for at-home martial arts practice for children with ADHD under the age of seven.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017-12

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Pre-Post Intervention Evaluation on Human Trafficking Knowledge, Beliefs, and Awareness of Health Care Professionals and Students

Description

Human trafficking is not only a social injustice, but also a major global health problem, that our communities cannot ignore. Despite the common misconception that trafficking is only seen in

Human trafficking is not only a social injustice, but also a major global health problem, that our communities cannot ignore. Despite the common misconception that trafficking is only seen in foreign countries or is only related to immigrants, the U.S. is known to be a major trafficking market and destination, with trafficking reported in all 50 states (Bladwin et al., 2011; Shandro et al., 2016; Dovydaitis, 2010). Although trafficking victims are unlikely to have appropriate access to health care, as much as 80% of sex trafficking victims have reported that they encountered a medical professional while under their traffickers' control and went unidentified at the time (Baldwin et al., 2011; Shandro et al., 2016). This exemplifies a serious missed opportunity for intervention. Health care providers should be prepared to identify and care for victims of trafficking as part of their routine clinical practice. This thesis aims to describe trafficking victims' encounters in U.S. health care settings, to assess health care professionals' and students' awareness, knowledge, and beliefs on trafficking, to examine the impact of an educational intervention on this populations' knowledge/belief changes, and to ultimately spread education about this issue to a wide array of communities.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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Mindfulness as an Intervention to Mitigate and Decrease Rates of Burnout in Registered Nurses: A Systematic Literature Review

Description

The aim of this review is to explore the effects of mindfulness-based interventions on Registered Nurse's rate of burnout and stress. Particularly focusing on the mitigation and decrease of burnout.

The aim of this review is to explore the effects of mindfulness-based interventions on Registered Nurse's rate of burnout and stress. Particularly focusing on the mitigation and decrease of burnout. Burnout is a multifaceted, complex issue that has become engrained in the culture of nursing and a widespread epidemic. Burnout has detrimental effects for the quality of life of the nurse, patient outcomes, interprofessional collaboration, and nursing practice. A systematic literature review incorporating qualitative data and analyzing the quantitative data was conducted. Studies on the effects of mindfulness-based interventions for nurses relating to burnout published between January 2008 and May 2018 were identified through a systematic search in electronic databases: CINHAL, Cochrane, Embase, Medline, PsycInfo, and PubMed. Gray literature was searched through Scopus and clinical trials were explored through clincialtrials.gov. Data analysis was based on 8 data points that were extracted from the research. A total of 17 articles were selected for inclusion in the systematic literature review. There were several different types of studies including single group intervention study, randomized control trial interventions studies, mixed model, quasi-experimental studies with controls, and a non-randomized controlled comparison. All relied on self-reporting scales and questionnaire for quantitative pre-post intervention changes. Overall, the 10 of the 17 studies found that there was a statistically significant decrease in burnout rates and an increase in mindfulness post intervention. Several other factors improved in a number of studies such as quality of life, decreased stress, increased sense of personal accomplishment, and decreased emotional exhaustion. There were also indications of an improvement in the individual's holistic well-being (e.g. inner state of calmness, awareness and enthusiasm) relating to improved mindfulness levels in 12 of the studies. Based on the results of this systematic review, mindfulness may be considered a potentially effective intervention for decreasing nurse burnout and mitigating future burnout. This intervention could be useful in a number of contexts including on-site and off-site programs with institutional support. Future research should explore longitudinal outcomes of mindfulness practice, symptom focused outcome measures, and multi-modal studies.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-12

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A Biobehavioral Model of Weight Loss Associated With Meditative Movement Practice Among Breast Cancer Survivors

Description

Women with breast cancer often experience weight gain during and after treatment, significantly increasing risk for recurrence as well as all-cause mortality. Based on a growing body of evidence, meditative

Women with breast cancer often experience weight gain during and after treatment, significantly increasing risk for recurrence as well as all-cause mortality. Based on a growing body of evidence, meditative movement practices may be effective for weight management. First, we describe the effects of stress on factors associated with weight gain for breast cancer survivors. Then, a model is proposed that utilizes existing evidence to suggest how meditative movement supports behavioral, psychological, and neurohormonal changes that may explain weight loss. Application of the model suggests how a novel “mindful-body-wisdom” approach may work to help reduce weight for this at-risk group.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2014-12-24

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Effects of Qigong and Tai Chi Easy (QTC) on Cardiometabolic Risk Factors

Description

In this project I explored the relationship between Qigong and Tai Chi Easy meditative practices and cardiometabolic risk factors, specifically looking at obesity and stress. The meditative focus of Qigong

In this project I explored the relationship between Qigong and Tai Chi Easy meditative practices and cardiometabolic risk factors, specifically looking at obesity and stress. The meditative focus of Qigong and Tai Chi Easy was expected to improve cardiac vagal tone which should lead to decreases in the inflammatory effects of stress. Additionally, due to the decreases in the harmful effects of stress, we expect to see a decrease in obesity through decreases in BMI and in waist circumference.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

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Yoga as an Effective Intervention for Adolescent Depression: A Systematic Review

Description

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of a yoga intervention for adolescents suffering from depression. Secondary results regarding the viability of yoga as an intervention

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of a yoga intervention for adolescents suffering from depression. Secondary results regarding the viability of yoga as an intervention for increasing self-esteem and decreasing anxiety were also explored.

Methods: Using PubMed, Medline, and CINAHL the search terms adolescents, depression, and yoga were searched for related articles. Articles were then excluded or included based on certain criteria. Focus was placed on articles written within the last 10 years as well as studies done on children within 10-19 years of age. Final articles underwent extraction for relevant information and comparisons were drawn between the studies.

Results: Final exclusion lead to a total of 5 suitable studies. Studies varied in styles of yoga performed and measurement scales used to assess depression. Populations of adolescents varied significantly as well. The majority of these studies showed significant improvement in depression symptoms when measuring from pre to post intervention. Similar improvements were also noted in anxiety symptoms and low self-esteem.

Conclusion: Data gathered indicated that yoga serves a suitable intervention for decreasing depression symptoms in adolescents. Additionally, there seems to be promising results regarding the viability of yoga as an intervention for decreasing symptoms of anxiety and increasing self-esteem. Despite, current promising results, there is need for more research to affirm the findings found in these articles to determine the long term effects of yoga interventions.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05