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A Biobehavioral Model of Weight Loss Associated With Meditative Movement Practice Among Breast Cancer Survivors

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Women with breast cancer often experience weight gain during and after treatment, significantly increasing risk for recurrence as well as all-cause mortality. Based on a growing body of evidence, meditative

Women with breast cancer often experience weight gain during and after treatment, significantly increasing risk for recurrence as well as all-cause mortality. Based on a growing body of evidence, meditative movement practices may be effective for weight management. First, we describe the effects of stress on factors associated with weight gain for breast cancer survivors. Then, a model is proposed that utilizes existing evidence to suggest how meditative movement supports behavioral, psychological, and neurohormonal changes that may explain weight loss. Application of the model suggests how a novel “mindful-body-wisdom” approach may work to help reduce weight for this at-risk group.

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Date Created
  • 2014-12-24

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Translating the Group Lifestyle Balance ProgramTM for Use Among Obese and Overweight Adults with Arthritis: Effects on Measures of Balance

Description

Obesity and arthritis are risk factors for falls. Little is known about the effects of weight loss on balance in people with arthritis. The Group Lifestyle Balance (GLB) ProgramTM is

Obesity and arthritis are risk factors for falls. Little is known about the effects of weight loss on balance in people with arthritis. The Group Lifestyle Balance (GLB) ProgramTM is an evidence-based, lifestyle change program for weight loss in individuals with prediabetes but it hasn’t been evaluated in people with arthritis. The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the effectiveness of an adapted version of the GLB on balance outcomes among overweight (Body Mass Index (BMI) >27) individuals with arthritis. A single-group, quasi- experimental design was used to examine the effects of the adapted GLB program on measures of balance and function. All participants (N=17) received the GLB program and completed the following assessments at baseline, 12 weeks and six months: the Timed-Up-and-Go (TUG), 10 Meter gait speed, Fullerton Advanced Balance Scale (FAB) and the Activity Based Confidence survey (ABC). Repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVAs) were used to examine changes over time in SPSS Version 24. Participants (mean age = 71.7 years) were primarily female (82%), white (94%), and college educated (94%). There was a linear (F1=14.82, p=.002) and quadratic (F1=7.20, p=.017) effect of time for the TUG. There was a linear effect of time on the FAB (F1=7.10, p=.017), and on both the customary (F1=5.44, p=.033) and fast walking pace (F1=7.59, p=.014) 10-meter gait speed assessments. There were no significant changes on the ABC. The Group Lifestyle Balance program may be an effective way to improve balance and function among overweight and obese individuals with arthritis.

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Date Created
  • 2019