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The future grid will face challenges to meet an increased power demand by the consumers. Various solutions were studied to address this issue. One alternative to realize increased power flow

The future grid will face challenges to meet an increased power demand by the consumers. Various solutions were studied to address this issue. One alternative to realize increased power flow in the grid is to use High Temperature Low Sag (HTLS) since it fulfills essential criteria of less sag and good material performance with temperature. HTLS conductors like Aluminum Conductor Composite Reinforced (ACCR) and Aluminum Conductor Carbon Composite (ACCC) are expected to face high operating temperatures of 150-200 degree Celsius in order to achieve the desired increased power flow. Therefore, it is imperative to characterize the material performance of these conductors with temperature. The work presented in this thesis addresses the characterization of carbon composite core based and metal matrix core based HTLS conductors. The thesis focuses on the study of variation of tensile strength of the carbon composite core with temperature and the level of temperature rise of the HTLS conductors due to fault currents cleared by backup protection. In this thesis, Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) was used to quantify the loss in storage modulus of carbon composite cores with temperature. It has been previously shown in literature that storage modulus is correlated to the tensile strength of the composite. Current temperature relationships of HTLS conductors were determined using the IEEE 738-2006 standard. Temperature rise of these conductors due to fault currents were also simulated. All simulations were performed using Microsoft Visual C++ suite. Tensile testing of metal matrix core was also performed. Results of DMA on carbon composite cores show that the storage modulus, hence tensile strength, decreases rapidly in the temperature range of intended use. DMA on composite cores subjected to heat treatment were conducted to investigate any changes in the variation of storage modulus curves. The experiments also indicates that carbon composites cores subjected to temperatures at or above 250 degree Celsius can cause permanent loss of mechanical properties including tensile strength. The fault current temperature analysis of carbon composite based conductors reveal that fault currents eventually cleared by backup protection in the event of primary protection failure can cause damage to fiber matrix interface.

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    by Koustubh Banerjee

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