Matching Items (6)

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NANOSCALE INTERPHASE CHARACTERIZATION OF POROUS CNT BUCKYPAPER COMPOSITES IN CORRELATION TO INTERLAMINAR MODE I FRACTURE

Description

In this conference paper, nanoscale material property data and ASTM mode I interlaminar fracture results for three-phase buckypaper samples are presented and analyzed. Vacuum filtration and surfactant-free methods were used

In this conference paper, nanoscale material property data and ASTM mode I interlaminar fracture results for three-phase buckypaper samples are presented and analyzed. Vacuum filtration and surfactant-free methods were used to manufacture buckypaper membranes. Epoxy infused buckypaper membranes were placed in front of the crack tip in a stitch bonded carbon fiber polymer matrix composite using a hand layup technique. Peak Force Quantitative Nanomechanical Mapping (PFQNM), using probes with nominal tip radius in the range of 5 to 8 nm were used. PFQNM fully characterized the interphase region between a three-phase sample of carbon monofilament, epoxy resin, and multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) buckypaper. This experiment captured reproducible nanoscale morphological, viscoelastic, elastic and energy properties of porous MWCNT buckypaper samples. An enlarged interphase region surrounding the CNT buckypaper was found. The buckypaper and epoxy interphase thickness was found to be 50nm, higher than the 10-40nm reported for epoxy and carbon monofilaments. The observed MWCNT structure provides explanation of the increased surface roughness compared to the smooth carbon monofilaments. The increased surface roughness likely improves mechanical interlocking with the epoxy of adjacent lamina. The interphase and subsurface characterization data at the nanoscale level provide explanation for a change in crack propagation toughness. Nanoscale analysis of the buckypaper surface proved the inhomogeneous properties even at the scale of a few square micrometer. The improvement in crack initiation and propagation energy is due to mechanical interlocking, crack path diversion, and the large interphase zone surrounding the buckypaper.

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Date Created
  • 2020-05

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Carbonaceous nanomaterials as flame retardant coating on fabric

Description

Flame retardants (FRs) are applied to variety of consumer products such as textiles and polymers for fire prevention and fire safety. Substantial research is ongoing to replace traditional FRs with

Flame retardants (FRs) are applied to variety of consumer products such as textiles and polymers for fire prevention and fire safety. Substantial research is ongoing to replace traditional FRs with alternative materials that are less toxic, present higher flame retardancy and result in lower overall exposure as there are potential health concerns in case of exposure to popular FRs. Carbonaceous nanomaterials (CNMs) such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene oxide (GO) have been studied and applied to polymer composites and electronics extensively due to their remarkable properties. Hence CNMs are considered as potential alternative materials that present high flame retardancy. In this research, different kinds of CNMs coatings on polyester fabric are produced and evaluated for their use as flame retardants. To monitor the mass loading of CNMs coated on the fabric, a two-step analytical method for quantifying CNMs embedded in polymer composites was developed. This method consisted of polymer dissolution process using organic solvents followed by subsequent programmed thermal analysis (PTA). This quantification technique was applicable to CNTs with and without high metal impurities in a broad range of polymers. Various types of CNMs were coated on polyester fabric and the efficacy of coatings as flame retardant was evaluated. The oxygen content of CNMs emerged as a critical parameter impacting flame retardancy with higher oxygen content resulting in less FR efficacy. The most performant nanomaterials, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and amine functionalized multi-walled carbon nantoubes (NH2-MWCNT) showed similar FR properties to current flame retardants with low mass loading (0.18 g/m2) and hence are promising alternatives that warrant further investigation. Chemical/physical modification of MWCNTs was conducted to produce well-dispersed MWCNT solutions without involving oxygen for uniform FR coating. The MWCNTs coating was studied to evaluate the durability of the coating and the impact on the efficacy during use phase by conducting mechanical abrasion and washing test. Approximately 50% and 40% of MWCNTs were released from 1 set of mechanical abrasion and washing test respectively. The losses during simulated usage impacted the flame retardancy negatively.

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Date Created
  • 2018

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Synthesis, characterizations and applications of mesoporous carbon composites

Description

This dissertation provides a fundamental understanding of the properties of mesoporous carbon based materials and the utilization of those properties into different applications such as electrodes materials for super capacitors,

This dissertation provides a fundamental understanding of the properties of mesoporous carbon based materials and the utilization of those properties into different applications such as electrodes materials for super capacitors, adsorbents for water treatments and biosensors. The thickness of mesoporous carbon films on Si substrates are measured by Ellipsometry method and pore size distribution has been calculated by Kelvin equation based on toluene adsorption and desorption isotherms monitored by Ellipsometer. The addition of organometallics cobalt and vanalyl acetylacetonate in the synthesis precursor leads to the metal oxides in the carbon framework, which largely decreased the shrink of the framework during carbonization, resulting in an increase in the average pore size. In addition to the structural changes, the introduction of metal oxides into mesoporous carbon framework greatly enhances the electrochemical performance as a result of their pseudocapacitance. Also, after the addition of Co into the framework, the contraction of mesoporous powders decreased significantly and the capacitance increased prominently because of the solidification function of CoO nanoparticles. When carbon-cobalt composites are used as adsorbent, the adsorption capacity of dye pollutant in water is remarkably higher (90 mg/g) after adding Co than the mesoporous carbon powder (2 mg/g). Furthermore, the surface area and pore size of mesoporous composites can be greatly increased by addition of tetraethyl orthosilicate into the precursor with subsequent etching, which leads to a dramatic increase in the adsorption capacity from 90 mg/g up to 1151 mg/g. When used as electrode materials for amperometric biosensors, mesoporous carbons showed good sensitivity, selectivity and stability. And fluorine-free and low-cost poly (methacrylate)s have been developed as binders for screen printed biosensors. With using only 5wt% of poly (hydroxybutyl methacrylate), the glucose sensor maintained mechanical integrity and exhibited excellent sensitivity on detecting glucose level in whole rabbit blood. Furthermore, extremely high surface area mesoporous carbons have been synthesized by introducing inorganic Si precursor during self-assembly, which effectively determined norepinephrine at very low concentrations.

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Date Created
  • 2012

Making the case for high temperature low sag (HTLS) overhead transmission line conductors

Description

The future grid will face challenges to meet an increased power demand by the consumers. Various solutions were studied to address this issue. One alternative to realize increased power flow

The future grid will face challenges to meet an increased power demand by the consumers. Various solutions were studied to address this issue. One alternative to realize increased power flow in the grid is to use High Temperature Low Sag (HTLS) since it fulfills essential criteria of less sag and good material performance with temperature. HTLS conductors like Aluminum Conductor Composite Reinforced (ACCR) and Aluminum Conductor Carbon Composite (ACCC) are expected to face high operating temperatures of 150-200 degree Celsius in order to achieve the desired increased power flow. Therefore, it is imperative to characterize the material performance of these conductors with temperature. The work presented in this thesis addresses the characterization of carbon composite core based and metal matrix core based HTLS conductors. The thesis focuses on the study of variation of tensile strength of the carbon composite core with temperature and the level of temperature rise of the HTLS conductors due to fault currents cleared by backup protection. In this thesis, Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) was used to quantify the loss in storage modulus of carbon composite cores with temperature. It has been previously shown in literature that storage modulus is correlated to the tensile strength of the composite. Current temperature relationships of HTLS conductors were determined using the IEEE 738-2006 standard. Temperature rise of these conductors due to fault currents were also simulated. All simulations were performed using Microsoft Visual C++ suite. Tensile testing of metal matrix core was also performed. Results of DMA on carbon composite cores show that the storage modulus, hence tensile strength, decreases rapidly in the temperature range of intended use. DMA on composite cores subjected to heat treatment were conducted to investigate any changes in the variation of storage modulus curves. The experiments also indicates that carbon composites cores subjected to temperatures at or above 250 degree Celsius can cause permanent loss of mechanical properties including tensile strength. The fault current temperature analysis of carbon composite based conductors reveal that fault currents eventually cleared by backup protection in the event of primary protection failure can cause damage to fiber matrix interface.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2014

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Multi-hazard damage mitigation for low-rise wood-framed structures using a CarbonFlex composite

Description

This study focused on investigating the ability of a polymeric-enhanced high-tenacity fabric composite called CarbonFlex to mitigate damages from multi-natural hazards, which are earthquakes and tornadoes, in wood-framed structures. Typically,

This study focused on investigating the ability of a polymeric-enhanced high-tenacity fabric composite called CarbonFlex to mitigate damages from multi-natural hazards, which are earthquakes and tornadoes, in wood-framed structures. Typically, wood-framed shear wall is a seismic protection system used in low-rise wood structures. It is well-known that the main energy dissipation of the system is its fasteners (nails) which are not enough to dissipate energy leading to decreasing of structure's integrity. Moreover, wood shear walls could not sustain their stiffness after experiencing moderate wall drift which made them susceptible to strong aftershocks. Therefore, CarbonFlex shear wall system was proposed to be used in the wood-framed structures. Seven full-size CarbonFlex shear walls and a CarbonFlex wrapped structures were tested. The results were compared to those of conventional wood-framed shear walls and a wood structure. The comparisons indicated that CarbonFlex specimens could sustain their strength and fully recover their initial stiffness although they experienced four percent story drift while the stiffness of the conventional structure dramatically degraded. This indicated that CarbonFlex shear wall systems provided a better seismic protection to wood-framed structures. To evaluate capability of CarbonFlex to resist impact damages from wind-borne debris in tornadoes, several debris impact tests of CarbonFlex and a carbon fiber reinforced storm shelter's wall panels were conducted. The results showed that three CarbonFlex wall panels passed the test at the highest debris impact speed and the other two passed the test at the second highest speed while the carbon fiber panel failed both impact speeds.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2013

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Integrated structural health management of complex carbon fiber reinforced composite structures

Description

Structural health management (SHM) is emerging as a vital methodology to help engineers improve the safety and maintainability of critical structures. SHM systems are designed to reliably monitor and test

Structural health management (SHM) is emerging as a vital methodology to help engineers improve the safety and maintainability of critical structures. SHM systems are designed to reliably monitor and test the health and performance of structures in aerospace, civil, and mechanical engineering applications. SHM combines multidisciplinary technologies including sensing, signal processing, pattern recognition, data mining, high fidelity probabilistic progressive damage models, physics based damage models, and regression analysis. Due to the wide application of carbon fiber reinforced composites and their multiscale failure mechanisms, it is necessary to emphasize the research of SHM on composite structures. This research develops a comprehensive framework for the damage detection, localization, quantification, and prediction of the remaining useful life of complex composite structures. To interrogate a composite structure, guided wave propagation is applied to thin structures such as beams and plates. Piezoelectric transducers are selected because of their versatility, which allows them to be used as sensors and actuators. Feature extraction from guided wave signals is critical to demonstrate the presence of damage and estimate the damage locations. Advanced signal processing techniques are employed to extract robust features and information. To provide a better estimate of the damage for accurate life estimation, probabilistic regression analysis is used to obtain a prediction model for the prognosis of complex structures subject to fatigue loading. Special efforts have been applied to the extension of SHM techniques on aerospace and spacecraft structures, such as UAV composite wings and deployable composite boom structures. Necessary modifications of the developed SHM techniques were conducted to meet the unique requirements of the aerospace structures. The developed SHM algorithms are able to accurately detect and quantify impact damages as well as matrix cracking introduced.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2012