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Volumetric cell imaging using 3D optical Computed Tomography (cell CT) is advantageous for identification and characterization of cancer cells. Many diseases arise from genomic changes, some of which are manifest

Volumetric cell imaging using 3D optical Computed Tomography (cell CT) is advantageous for identification and characterization of cancer cells. Many diseases arise from genomic changes, some of which are manifest at the cellular level in cytostructural and protein expression (functional) features which can be resolved, captured and quantified in 3D far more sensitively and specifically than in traditional 2D microscopy. Live single cells were rotated about an axis perpendicular to the optical axis to facilitate data acquisition for functional live cell CT imaging. The goal of this thesis research was to optimize and characterize the microvortex rotation chip. Initial efforts concentrated on optimizing the microfabrication process in terms of time (6-8 hours v/s 12-16 hours), yield (100% v/s 40-60%) and ease of repeatability. This was done using a tilted exposure lithography technique, as opposed to the backside diffuser photolithography (BDPL) method used previously (Myers 2012) (Chang and Yoon 2004). The fabrication parameters for the earlier BDPL technique were also optimized so as to improve its reliability. A new, PDMS to PDMS demolding process (soft lithography) was implemented, greatly improving flexibility in terms of demolding and improving the yield to 100%, up from 20-40%. A new pump and flow sensor assembly was specified, tested, procured and set up, allowing for both pressure-control and flow-control (feedback-control) modes; all the while retaining the best features of a previous, purpose-built pump assembly. Pilot experiments were performed to obtain the flow rate regime required for cell rotation. These experiments also allowed for the determination of optimal trapezoidal neck widths (opening to the main flow channel) to be used for cell rotation characterization. The optimal optical trap forces were experimentally estimated in order to minimize the required optical power incident on the cell. Finally, the relationships between (main channel) flow rates and cell rotation rates were quantified for different trapezoidal chamber dimensions, and at predetermined constant values of laser trapping strengths, allowing for parametric characterization of the system.

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    Date Created
    • 2013
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    • Partial requirement for: M.S., Arizona State University, 2013
      Note type
      thesis
    • Includes bibliographical references (p. 63-68)
      Note type
      bibliography
    • Field of study: Bioengineering

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    by Rishabh M. Shetty

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