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Despite significant advances in digital pathology and automation sciences, current diagnostic practice for cancer detection primarily relies on a qualitative manual inspection of tissue architecture and cell and nuclear morphology

Despite significant advances in digital pathology and automation sciences, current diagnostic practice for cancer detection primarily relies on a qualitative manual inspection of tissue architecture and cell and nuclear morphology in stained biopsies using low-magnification, two-dimensional (2D) brightfield microscopy. The efficacy of this process is limited by inter-operator variations in sample preparation and imaging, and by inter-observer variability in assessment.

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    Date Created
    • 2013
    Resource Type
  • Text
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    • Partial requirement for: Ph.D., Arizona State University, 2013
      Note type
      thesis
    • Includes bibliographical references (p. 74-81)
      Note type
      bibliography
    • Field of study: Electrical engineering

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    by Vivek Nandakumar

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