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For some children, peer victimization stops rather quickly, whereas for others it marks the beginning of a long trajectory of peer abuse (Kochenderfer-Ladd & Wardrop, 2001). Unfortunately, we know little

For some children, peer victimization stops rather quickly, whereas for others it marks the beginning of a long trajectory of peer abuse (Kochenderfer-Ladd & Wardrop, 2001). Unfortunately, we know little about these trajectories and what factors may influence membership in increasing or decreasing victimization over time. To address this question, I identified children's developmental patterns of victimization in early elementary school and examined which child-level factors influenced children's membership in victimization trajectories using latent growth mixture modeling.

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    Date Created
    • 2015
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  • Text
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    • Partial requirement for: Ph. D., Arizona State University, 2015
      Note type
      thesis
    • Includes bibliographical references (pages 49-58)
      Note type
      bibliography
    • Field of study: Family and human development

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    by Laura K. Clary

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