Matching Items (20)

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Cultural Values and Mexican-Origin Adolescent Mothers' Use of Prenatal Care

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This study examined the associations between Mexican-origin adolescent mothers’ and their female family members’ familism values and prenatal healthcare among Mexican-origin adolescent mothers. Participants were 204 adolescent mothers between the

This study examined the associations between Mexican-origin adolescent mothers’ and their female family members’ familism values and prenatal healthcare among Mexican-origin adolescent mothers. Participants were 204 adolescent mothers between the ages of 15 and 18 (M = 16.19 years; SD = .97) as well as their female family members who were visited in their homes when adolescent mothers were in their third trimester. Adolescent mothers and their female family members reported on their familism values and adolescent mothers reported on the timing of the first prenatal care visit, number of prenatal visits, and barriers to prenatal care. On average, adolescent mothers had their first prenatal care appointment at 11.5 weeks and averaged slightly less than eight prenatal care visits. A number of associations emerged between dimensions of familism and prenatal care. For example, adolescent mothers’ higher familism support values were associated with less barriers to receiving prenatal care, and female family members’ higher family obligation values were correlated with adolescent mothers having their first prenatal visit later in the pregnancy. In the overall pattern, more correlations emerged for Mexico-born as compared to U.S.-born family members. These findings provide insights about the associations between familism and Mexican-origin adolescent mothers’ prenatal care, suggesting the need for further study of the links between cultural values and prenatal care among vulnerable populations.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

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Designing a Program Evaluation to Measure the Outcomes of Youth Leadership Programs: A Collaboration between Arizona Facts of Life and the Community Action Research Experiences (CARE) Program

Description

The Community Action Research Experiences (CARE) Program collaborated with a local non-profit organization called Arizona Facts of Life to design a program evaluation for their Youth Leadership Development Training Program,

The Community Action Research Experiences (CARE) Program collaborated with a local non-profit organization called Arizona Facts of Life to design a program evaluation for their Youth Leadership Development Training Program, FACTS Curriculum. The purpose of this study was to identify targeted program outcomes, design an assessment to address these outcomes, and recommend possible evaluation designs. Arizona Facts of Life will implement the assessment using one of the recommended evaluation designs, and use the results to measure their Youth Leadership Development Training Program's outcomes and demonstrate efficacy.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

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Cultural Orientation, Values, & Immigration: Effects on Latino Parent Support in Science

Description

This study examined associations between Latino parents' cultural orientation and their behaviors in support of their 9th grade adolescents in science (n= 104). Parents reported their orientation to mainstream U.S.

This study examined associations between Latino parents' cultural orientation and their behaviors in support of their 9th grade adolescents in science (n= 104). Parents reported their orientation to mainstream U.S. and Latino culture, traditional cultural values, and immigration status. Adolescents reported how often their parents engaged with them in science related behaviors, such as general positive support in science, school involvement, teaching them things about science, discussing the future, and engaging in science-related co-activity. Results indicate that adolescent boys whose parents lack U.S. documentation are in greatest need of parent support in science.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05

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Mexican American Female Perspectives on Marriage and Childbearing

Description

The present study examined Mexican American females’ perspectives on childbearing and marriage and the role of cultural influences on their perspectives given high rates of pregnancy and early marriage among

The present study examined Mexican American females’ perspectives on childbearing and marriage and the role of cultural influences on their perspectives given high rates of pregnancy and early marriage among Mexican and Mexican American females in the U.S. and worldwide. Participants were ten Mexican American females between 20 and 22 years of age who participated in qualitative interviews about their perspectives on marriage and childbearing and how their Mexican cultural background, including their upbringing, family members, peers, and the media influenced their perspectives. Findings highlight that there is indeed a connection between Mexican culture and perspectives on marriage and childbearing amongst participants, and participants particularly noted the role of female family members, stereotypes, and educational pursuits in shaping their perspectives.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

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Strategies for Implementing an Evaluation for the BLOOM for Healthy Relationships Program

Description

The issue of adolescent dating violence is a relatively new field of research, but several studies have shown that adolescent dating violence is distinct from adult domestic violence and has

The issue of adolescent dating violence is a relatively new field of research, but several studies have shown that adolescent dating violence is distinct from adult domestic violence and has its own implications and patterns. Many studies have shown that both males and females appear to be the victims and perpetrators of dating violence, and often times in abusive dating relationships, the perpetration is mutual. Involvement with adolescent dating violence has serious physical and psychological health consequences, and in order to combat this social phenomenon, effective prevention programs are needed. The present study discusses key characteristics of school-based prevention programs that have been shown to be effective, as well as looks specifically at one such prevention program called BLOOM for Healthy Relationships™. The researcher in this study originally set out to conduct a program evaluation of BLOOM, but encountered several obstacles with the approval process that prevented the evaluation from being completed in the available time frame. This report is now framed as a case study that will discuss the necessary resources for preparing to conduct a program evaluation, describe the obstacles encountered in the approval process and make suggestions for future strategies to complete program evaluations of BLOOM.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05

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Links Between Adolescents’ and Parents’ Depressive Symptoms in Mexican-origin Families

Description

The present study examined associations between depressive symptoms among mothers, fathers,<br/>and adolescents and considered whether different associations emerged by parent and adolescent<br/>gender. In addition, the combination of maternal and paternal

The present study examined associations between depressive symptoms among mothers, fathers,<br/>and adolescents and considered whether different associations emerged by parent and adolescent<br/>gender. In addition, the combination of maternal and paternal depressive symptoms was<br/>examined in relation to adolescents’ depressive symptoms. Participants were 246 families of<br/>Mexican-origin in two-parent households who resided in the Phoenix metropolitan area. Data<br/>were collected during home interviews at Time 1 and phone calls with adolescents at Time 2.<br/>Findings revealed concurrent bivariate associations between adolescents’ and mothers’ and<br/>fathers’ depressive symptoms. Further, mothers’ depressive symptoms predicted increases in<br/>adolescents’ symptoms two years later. However, there were no significant gender differences,<br/>and the combination of mothers’ and fathers’ depressive symptoms did not predict adolescents’<br/>depressive symptoms. These findings contribute to understanding the interrelations between<br/>Mexican-origin mothers’, fathers’, and adolescents’ depressive symptoms.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

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Relations Between Gender Typicality and Adjustment in Adolescence

Description

The degree to which adolescents describe themselves as gender typical, as defined by their interests, activities, personal qualities, and other characteristics, is related to a broad range of adjustment indices.

The degree to which adolescents describe themselves as gender typical, as defined by their interests, activities, personal qualities, and other characteristics, is related to a broad range of adjustment indices. The goal of this thesis was to review studies conducted between 2000 and 2017 to provide a summary and critique of this research. A total of 18 studies were reviewed. The majority of findings indicate a positive association between gender typicality and beneficial adjustment outcomes, and a negative association between gender typicality and poor adjustment outcomes. Suggestions for future research and clinical implications of these findings are discussed.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2017-05

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Mexican-Origin Adolescents in Latino Neighborhoods: A Prospective and Mixed Methods Approach

Description

Neighborhoods are important aspects of the adolescent and family ecology. Cultural developmental perspectives posit that neighborhood environments contain both promoting and inhibiting characteristics for ethnic-racial minoritized populations (García Coll et

Neighborhoods are important aspects of the adolescent and family ecology. Cultural developmental perspectives posit that neighborhood environments contain both promoting and inhibiting characteristics for ethnic-racial minoritized populations (García Coll et al., 1996). Historically, neighborhood researchers have approached Latino neighborhoods from a deficit perspective. Thus, there is limited research about how Latino neighborhoods support Latino youth development and family processes. In my dissertation, I examine both the promoting and inhibiting aspects of Latino identified neighborhoods for adolescent development.

In study 1, I prospectively examined a model in which Mexican-origin parents’ perceptions of social and cultural resources in neighborhoods may support parents to engage in higher levels of cultural socialization and, in turn, promote adolescents’ ethnic-racial identity (ERI). Findings suggest neighborhood social and cultural cohesion in late childhood promoted middle adolescents’ ERI affirmation via intermediate increases in maternal cultural socialization. Similar patterns were observed for ERI resolution, but only for adolescents whose mothers were born in the United States. Findings have critical implications for how neighborhoods support parents’ cultural socialization practices and adolescents’ ERI.

In study 2, I used a convergent mixed methods research design to compare and contrast researchers’ neighborhood assessments collected using systematic social observations (e.g., physical disorder, sociocultural symbols) with adolescents’ qualitative neighborhood assessments collected by semi-structured interviews with Mexican-origin adolescents. Using quantitative methods, I found that researchers observed varying degrees of physical disorder, physical decay, street safety, and sociocultural symbols across adolescents’ neighborhood environments. Using qualitative methods, I found that adolescents observed these same neighborhood features about half the time, but also that they often layered additional meaning on top of distinct neighborhood features. Using mixed methods I found that, in the context of high spatial concordance, there was a high degree of overlap between researchers and adolescents in terms of agreement on the presence of physical disorder, physical decay, street safety, and sociocultural symbols. Lastly, adolescents often expanded upon these neighborhood environmental features, especially with references to positive and negative affect and resources. Overall, findings from study 2 underscore the importance using mixed methods to address the shared and unique aspects of researchers’ objectivity and adolescents’ phenomenology.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020

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Child-level predictors of boys' and girls' trajectories of physical, verbal, and relational victimization

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For some children, peer victimization stops rather quickly, whereas for others it marks the beginning of a long trajectory of peer abuse (Kochenderfer-Ladd & Wardrop, 2001). Unfortunately, we know little

For some children, peer victimization stops rather quickly, whereas for others it marks the beginning of a long trajectory of peer abuse (Kochenderfer-Ladd & Wardrop, 2001). Unfortunately, we know little about these trajectories and what factors may influence membership in increasing or decreasing victimization over time. To address this question, I identified children's developmental patterns of victimization in early elementary school and examined which child-level factors influenced children's membership in victimization trajectories using latent growth mixture modeling. Results showed that boys and girls demonstrated differential victimization patterns over time that also varied by victimization type. For example, boys experienced more physical victimization than girls and increased victimization over time was predicted by boys who display high levels of negative emotion (e.g., anger) towards peers and low levels of effortful control (e.g., gets frustrated easily). Conversely, girls exhibited multiple trajectories of increasing relational victimization (i.e., talking about others behind their back) over time, whereas most boys experienced low levels or only slightly increasing relational victimization over time. For girls, withdrawn behavior lack of positive emotion, and displaying of negative emotions was predictive of experiencing high levels of victimization over time.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015

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The correlates and consequences of tomboyism: an exploration of gender-related characteristics, peer interactions, and psychosocial adjustment

Description

The study of tomboys offers useful insights for the field of gender development. Tomboys have been the focus of several studies aimed at defining what a tomboy is (Bailey, Bechtold,

The study of tomboys offers useful insights for the field of gender development. Tomboys have been the focus of several studies aimed at defining what a tomboy is (Bailey, Bechtold, & Berenbaum, 2002; Plumb & Cowan, 1984; Williams, Goodman, & Green, 1985) and what it means for children and adults who are tomboys (Morgan, 1998; Williams et al., 1985). These and further questions necessitate understanding the correlates and consequences for children exhibiting tomboy behaviors. This study aims to address these gaps in the literature as part of a longitudinal study assessing children's gendered attitudes, relationships, and beliefs. A group of 4th grade girls (N=98), were administered questionnaires asking them about their tomboy gender identity and related behaviors and beliefs. The first research question concerns how we identify tomboys through parent, teacher, and child self-report, and the application of groupings of tomboys as never, sometimes, and always tomboys. It was found that children who fall into different classifications of tomboyism differ on their similarity to own- and other-sex peers on a number of dimensions (e.g. similarity, peer preference, activity preference). Never tomboys had the most similarity and interest to own-sex peers, always tomboys, to other-sex peers, and sometimes tomboys exhibited the most flexibility with interest similar to both own- and other-sex peers. Peer-related adjustment consequences and experiences were considered for the different groups of tomboys, with always tomboys being the most efficacious with other-sex peers, never tomboys being the most efficacious with own-sex peers, and sometimes tomboys showing both own- and other-sex peer interactions and the least exclusion of any group.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2012