Description

Knowing that disorder is related to crime, it has become essential for criminologists to understand how and why certain individuals perceive disorder. Using data from the Perceptions of Neighborhood Disorder

Knowing that disorder is related to crime, it has become essential for criminologists to understand how and why certain individuals perceive disorder. Using data from the Perceptions of Neighborhood Disorder and Interpersonal Conflict Project, this study uses a fixed photograph of a neighborhood, to assess whether individuals "see" disorder cues. A final sample size of n=815 respondents were asked to indicate if they saw particular disorder cues in the photograph. The results show that certain personal characteristics do predict whether an individual sees disorder.

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    Date Created
    • 2013
    Resource Type
  • Text
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    Note
    • Partial requirement for: M.S., Arizona State University, 2013
      Note type
      thesis
    • Includes bibliographical references (p. 42-44)
      Note type
      bibliography
    • Field of study: Criminology and criminal justice

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    Statement of Responsibility

    by Christopher Scott

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