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In a typical living cell, millions to billions of proteins—nanomachines that fluctuate and cycle among many conformational states—convert available free energy into mechanochemical work. A fundamental goal of biophysics is

In a typical living cell, millions to billions of proteins—nanomachines that fluctuate and cycle among many conformational states—convert available free energy into mechanochemical work. A fundamental goal of biophysics is to ascertain how 3D protein structures encode specific functions, such as catalyzing chemical reactions or transporting nutrients into a cell. Protein dynamics span femtosecond timescales (i.e., covalent bond oscillations) to large conformational transition timescales in, and beyond, the millisecond regime (e.g., glucose transport across a phospholipid bilayer).

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    Date Created
    • 2017
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  • Text
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    • Partial requirement for: Ph.D., Arizona State University, 2017
      Note type
      thesis
    • Includes bibliographical references (pages 153-194)
      Note type
      bibliography
    • Field of study: Physics

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    by Sean L. Seyler

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