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In recent years, the use of biologically based (neurological, neuropsychological, genetic) evidence in criminal trials as support for claims of mental impairments among offenders has increased in popularity. However, research

In recent years, the use of biologically based (neurological, neuropsychological, genetic) evidence in criminal trials as support for claims of mental impairments among offenders has increased in popularity. However, research on how exposure to those arguments affects jury decision-making remains unclear. Specifically, arguments rooted in biology sometimes mitigate and sometimes aggravate judgments of criminal responsibility for mentally ill offenders, and this discrepancy seems to stem from the specific conditions by which that disorder was acquired.

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    Date Created
    • 2017
    Resource Type
  • Text
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    Note
    • Partial requirement for: M.S., Arizona State University, 2017
      Note type
      thesis
    • Includes bibliographical references (pages 35-37)
      Note type
      bibliography
    • Field of study: Psychology

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    by Shelby Hunter

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