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As a contribution to what has emerged categorically in medieval scholarship as gentry studies, this dissertation looks at the impact the development of obligatory taxation beyond customary dues and fees

As a contribution to what has emerged categorically in medieval scholarship as gentry studies, this dissertation looks at the impact the development of obligatory taxation beyond customary dues and fees had on late medieval English society with particular emphasis given to the emergent view of the medieval subject as a commercial-legal entity. Focusing on Middle English popular romance and drawing on the tenets of practice theory, I demonstrate the merger of commerce and law as a point of identification in the process of meaning and value making for late medieval gentry society.

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    Date Created
    • 2015
    Resource Type
  • Text
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    • Partial requirement for: Ph. D., Arizona State University, 2015
      Note type
      thesis
    • Includes bibliographical references (pages 172-192)
      Note type
      bibliography
    • Field of study: English

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    by Nathaniel Bump

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