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Religion and College Romance: A Qualitative Approach to Interfaith Dating

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The prevalence of interfaith marriages and relationships is increasing now more than ever, especially among university students. Interfaith marriages have been examined across cultures with a focus on quantitative data. Most of this information is related to interfaith marriages, but

The prevalence of interfaith marriages and relationships is increasing now more than ever, especially among university students. Interfaith marriages have been examined across cultures with a focus on quantitative data. Most of this information is related to interfaith marriages, but not much has been said about interfaith dating. The focus of this study is to examine people's accounts of their relationships in order to learn more about the nature of interfaith relationships, specifically in students. What is being in an interfaith relationship like? A qualitative approach using four couples (N=8) in a two-year or four-year university program was used to gain more insight into the religious aspect of relationships. Conducting interviews of the couples together and separately allowed the individuals to comment on marriage, weddings, family, children, and more with regards to how religion has played a role. By interviewing the couples themselves, insight is gained on their personal relationships with each other. The interactions these couples have together, as well as their responses during interviewing, have both lead to findings regarding what being engaged in an interfaith relationship is like. Each couple is different and has their own, unique story to share. This thesis examines (1) an overview of the couples, (2) what does religion mean to the members of each couple, (3) what does a relationship mean to the members of each couple, (4) marriage, (5) religion as a couple, (6) limitations, and (7) recommendations for future research. This thesis aims to use personal experiences in order to learn more about the nature of interfaith relationships.

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2018-05

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Fiscal morality and the state: commerce, law, and taxation in Middle English popular romance

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As a contribution to what has emerged categorically in medieval scholarship as gentry studies, this dissertation looks at the impact the development of obligatory taxation beyond customary dues and fees had on late medieval English society with particular emphasis given

As a contribution to what has emerged categorically in medieval scholarship as gentry studies, this dissertation looks at the impact the development of obligatory taxation beyond customary dues and fees had on late medieval English society with particular emphasis given to the emergent view of the medieval subject as a commercial-legal entity. Focusing on Middle English popular romance and drawing on the tenets of practice theory, I demonstrate the merger of commerce and law as a point of identification in the process of meaning and value making for late medieval gentry society. The introductory chapter provides an overview of the historical development of taxation and the emergence of royal authority as an institutionalized form of public welfare, or a state. The second chapter examines the use of contractual language in Sir Amadace to highlight the presence of the state as an extra-legal authority able to enforce contractual agreements. The attention paid to the consequences of economic insolvency stage a gentry identity circumscribed by its position in a network of credit and debt that links the individual to neighbor, state, and God. The third chapter explores conservative responses to economic innovation during the period and the failure of the state to protect the proprietary rights of landowners in Sir Cleges. Specifically, the chapter examines the strain the gradual re-definition of land as a movable property put on the proprietary rights of landowners and challenged the traditional manorial organization of feudal society by subjecting large estates to morcellation in the commercial market. The fourth chapter examines the socioeconomic foundations of late medieval English sovereignty in Sir Gawain and the Carle of Carlisle. By dismissing the cultural fantasies of power and authority bound up in the Arthurian narrative, the author reveals the practical economic mechanisms of exchange that sustain and legitimize sociopolitical authority, resulting in a corporate vision of English society. Collectively, the analyses demonstrate the influence the socioeconomic circumstances of gentry society exerted on the production and consumption of Middle English popular romance and the importance of commerce, law, and taxation in the formation of a sense of self in late medieval England.

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Date Created
2015

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Sensing Death: Variations in the Sensorium of the Old Norse, Anglo-French, and Middle English Tristans

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This thesis investigates the description of sensation in the scenes immediately before, during, and following the death of Tristan in variations in the Tristan cycle from the 12th through the 15th centuries. Using a sensory studies approach, the project considers

This thesis investigates the description of sensation in the scenes immediately before, during, and following the death of Tristan in variations in the Tristan cycle from the 12th through the 15th centuries. Using a sensory studies approach, the project considers these scenes as they are translated and transmitted from Thomas de Bretagne’s Tristan to the Old Norse Tristrams saga ok Ísöndar and Saga af Tristram ok Ísodd and into Sir Thomas Malory’s Le Morte d’Arthur, the last, great medieval treatment of the Tristan story. The scenes are understood in the context of the texts’ sensoria as defined by their cultural and historical contexts and the texts’ underpinning in philosophical and theological thought on the senses. The thesis project argues that the specific cultural preferences and usages of the senses can be made apparent through the comparison of Thomas’s Tristan, the Norse translations, and Malory’s text. Taken together, they show the importance of considering medieval translation when comparing the appearance of the senses in written artefacts from the Middle Ages. The sensory engagement with texts is deeply tied to the making of meaning and ethics in medieval literary works. The differences in how the senses are prioritized and framed suggest a larger variance within European Christian philosophical and theological thought on the senses and provide a potential framework for exploring this phenomenon in other medieval literary cycles.

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2021