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This chapter integrates from cognitive neuroscience, cognitive psychology, and social psychology the basic science of bias in human judgment as relevant to judgments and decisions by forensic mental health professionals.

This chapter integrates from cognitive neuroscience, cognitive psychology, and social psychology the basic science of bias in human judgment as relevant to judgments and decisions by forensic mental health professionals. Forensic mental health professionals help courts make decisions in cases when some question of psychology pertains to the legal issue, such as in insanity cases, child custody hearings, and psychological injuries in civil suits. The legal system itself and many people involved, such as jurors, assume mental health experts are “objective” and untainted by bias.

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  • 2017-04-30
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  • Text
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    • This copy of the chapter is the initial draft. It has not been through the editorial process yet.

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    This is a suggested citation. Consult the appropriate style guide for specific citation guidelines.

    Neal, T.M.S., Hight, M., Howatt, B.C., & Hamza, C. (in press). The cognitive and social psychological bases of bias in forensic mental health judgments. In M.K. Miller & B.H. Bornstein (Eds). Advances in Psychology and Law: Volume 3. New York: Springer.

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