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The Gratton effect, the observation that the size of the Stroop effect is larger following a congruent trial compared to an incongruent trial, is one pivotal observation in support of

The Gratton effect, the observation that the size of the Stroop effect is larger following a congruent trial compared to an incongruent trial, is one pivotal observation in support of the conflict-monitoring hypothesis. Previous reports have demonstrated that non-conflict components, such as feature binding, also contribute to this effect. Critically, Schmidt and De Houwer (2011) report a flanker task and a button-press Stroop task suggesting that there is no conflict adaptation in the Gratton effect; it is entirely caused by feature binding.

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    Date Created
    • 2014-10-24
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    Identifier
    • Digital object identifier: 10.3389/fpsyg.2014.01207
    • Identifier Type
      International standard serial number
      Identifier Value
      1353-8292

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    Blais, Chris, Stefanidi, Aikaterini, & Brewer, Gene A. (2014). The Gratton effect remains after controlling for contingencies and stimulus repetitions. FRONTIERS IN PSYCHOLOGY, 5:1207. http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2014.01207

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