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With technology changing how documents (of all types and format) are created, shared, and used, library personnel make interpretations of copyright law daily. Very little research has been done on how library personnel understand copyright law and their role in

With technology changing how documents (of all types and format) are created, shared, and used, library personnel make interpretations of copyright law daily. Very little research has been done on how library personnel understand copyright law and their role in interpreting it as part of their daily work, how comfortable they are with this task, what types of training they have received, or what types of training they believe they need.

To help fill this gap, librarians from California State University Chico, Portland Community College, and Arizona State University received a planning grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services to conduct a survey on copyright education in the 13 states in the Western United States. Unlike previous related studies, we sought responses from all types of libraries, library workers, and especially traditionally underrepresented groups.

With the hypothesis that libraries in the Western U.S. have unique barriers to quality copyright education, we conducted a survey and focus groups with library personnel regarding their prior copyright education; the need for additional education; and what barriers they face in accessing that education.

This is our final report as submitted to IMLS, planning grant log number RE-246437-OLS-20

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    Title
    • Report on a 2020-21 Study of Copyright Education Needs of Library Personnel in 13 Western States
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    Date Created
    2021
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