Design of Resistive Synaptic Devices and Array Architectures for Neuromorphic Computing

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Over the past few decades, the silicon complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology has been greatly scaled down to achieve higher performance, density and lower power consumption. As the device dimension is approaching

Over the past few decades, the silicon complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology has been greatly scaled down to achieve higher performance, density and lower power consumption. As the device dimension is approaching its fundamental physical limit, there is an increasing demand for exploration of emerging devices with distinct operating principles from conventional CMOS. In recent years, many efforts have been devoted in the research of next-generation emerging non-volatile memory (eNVM) technologies, such as resistive random access memory (RRAM) and phase change memory (PCM), to replace conventional digital memories (e.g. SRAM) for implementation of synapses in large-scale neuromorphic computing systems.

Essentially being compact and “analog”, these eNVM devices in a crossbar array can compute vector-matrix multiplication in parallel, significantly speeding up the machine/deep learning algorithms. However, non-ideal eNVM device and array properties may hamper the learning accuracy. To quantify their impact, the sparse coding algorithm was used as a starting point, where the strategies to remedy the accuracy loss were proposed, and the circuit-level design trade-offs were also analyzed. At architecture level, the parallel “pseudo-crossbar” array to prevent the write disturbance issue was presented. The peripheral circuits to support various parallel array architectures were also designed. One key component is the read circuit that employs the principle of integrate-and-fire neuron model to convert the analog column current to digital output. However, the read circuit is not area-efficient, which was proposed to be replaced with a compact two-terminal oscillation neuron device that exhibits metal-insulator-transition phenomenon.

To facilitate the design exploration, a circuit-level macro simulator “NeuroSim” was developed in C++ to estimate the area, latency, energy and leakage power of various neuromorphic architectures. NeuroSim provides a wide variety of design options at the circuit/device level. NeuroSim can be used alone or as a supporting module to provide circuit-level performance estimation in neural network algorithms. A 2-layer multilayer perceptron (MLP) simulator with integration of NeuroSim was demonstrated to evaluate both the learning accuracy and circuit-level performance metrics for the online learning and offline classification, as well as to study the impact of eNVM reliability issues such as data retention and write endurance on the learning performance.