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Psychological theories often reduce descriptions of people’s emotional experiences to a small number of underlying dimensions that capture most of the variation in their responses. These underlying dimensions are typically

Psychological theories often reduce descriptions of people’s emotional experiences to a small number of underlying dimensions that capture most of the variation in their responses. These underlying dimensions are typically uncovered by comparing the self-reported emotions of many individuals at one specific time point, to infer a single underlying structure of emotion for all people. However, theoretical work suggests that underlying dimensions uncovered in this way may not hold when modeling how people change over time.

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    Date Created
    • 2017
    Resource Type
  • Text
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    Note
    • Partial requirement for: Ph. D., Arizona State University, 2017
      Note type
      thesis
    • Includes bibliographical references (pages 46-53)
      Note type
      bibliography
    • Field of study: Psychology

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    by Alexander F. Danvers

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