Analysis and design of native file system enhancements for storage class memory

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Description

As persistent non-volatile memory solutions become integrated in the computing ecosystem and landscape, traditional commodity file systems architected and developed for traditional block I/O based memory solutions must be reevaluated.

As persistent non-volatile memory solutions become integrated in the computing ecosystem and landscape, traditional commodity file systems architected and developed for traditional block I/O based memory solutions must be reevaluated. A majority of commodity file systems have been architected and designed with the goal of managing data on non-volatile storage devices such as hard disk drives (HDDs) and solid state drives (SSDs). HDDs and SSDs are attached to a computing system via a controller or I/O hub, often referred to as the southbridge. The point of HDD and SSD attachment creates multiple levels of translation for any data managed by the CPU that must be stored in non-volatile memory (NVM) on an HDD or SSD. Storage Class Memory (SCM) devices provide the ability to store data at the CPU and DRAM level of a computing system. A novel set of modifications to the ext2 and ext4 commodity file systems to address the needs of SCM will be presented and discussed. An in-depth analysis of many existing file systems, from multiple sources, will be presented along with an analysis to identify key modifications and extensions that would be necessary to execute file system on SCM devices. From this analysis, modifications and extensions have been applied to the FAT commodity file system for key functional tests that will be presented to demonstrate the operation and execution of the file system extensions.