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During attempted fixation, the eyes are not still but continue to produce so called "fixational eye movements", which include microsaccades, drift, and tremor. Microsaccades are thought to help prevent and

During attempted fixation, the eyes are not still but continue to produce so called "fixational eye movements", which include microsaccades, drift, and tremor. Microsaccades are thought to help prevent and restore vision loss during fixation, and to correct fixation errors, but how they contribute to these functions remains a matter of debate. This dissertation presents the results of four experiments conducted to address current controversies concerning the role of microsaccades in visibility and oculomotor control.

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    Date Created
    • 2014
    Resource Type
  • Text
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    Note
    • Partial requirement for: Ph.D., Arizona State University, 2014
      Note type
      thesis
    • Includes bibliographical references (p. 82-90)
      Note type
      bibliography
    • Field of study: Neuroscience

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    by Francisco M. Costela

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