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This dissertation examines a practice of scientific museums in the 19th and early 20th centuries: the exchange of their duplicate specimens. Specimen exchange facilitated the rise of universal museums while

This dissertation examines a practice of scientific museums in the 19th and early 20th centuries: the exchange of their duplicate specimens. Specimen exchange facilitated the rise of universal museums while creating a transnational network through which objects, knowledge, and museum practitioners circulated. My primary focus concerns the exchange of anthropological duplicate specimens at the Smithsonian Institution from 1880 to 1920.

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    Date Created
    • 2014
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  • Text
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    • Partial requirement for: Ph.D., Arizona State University, 2014
      Note type
      thesis
    • Includes bibliographical references (p. 579-593)
      Note type
      bibliography
    • Field of study: Anthropology

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    by Catherine Nichols

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