Matching Items (10)

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Bringing History Alive In 2020

Description

Over the course of his four years of course, Matt Stockmal has told multiple historical stories for multiple different groups in multiple different mediums. As a Digital Culture major, these

Over the course of his four years of course, Matt Stockmal has told multiple historical stories for multiple different groups in multiple different mediums. As a Digital Culture major, these storytelling mediums were all infused with creative technology. As Matt comes to the close of his college career, he wanted to take the time to review his work, reflect on the merits of the medium used with regards to its ability to instill visceral impact, and write a series of tutorials using what was learned in the process of experimentation in historical storytelling.
The paper is meant to serve as a base of reference material for future, real world, project proposals to historical organizations. A mock proposal to the Fullersburg Historic Foundation, proposing the digital mediums and methods discussed, is included at the end of the paper.
In concluding thoughts, Matt I appears to have the depth and breadth of skills needed to make impactful media. And the mediums of media have been as diverse as the subjects they cover. But upon reviewing his own review, it took someone else smarter had to tell me that though there is diversity abound in his portfolio, there is a single baseline: Keeping history alive. Every one of these mediums can be used to infuse a sense of digital energy, simulated life, back into historical artifacts and documentation. The historical characters return to live when a medium brings back the motion, the energy, of the thing it is showing. If the medium infuses this life back into the story. The results are nothing short of magic.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

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K-8 STEAM Museum Proposal

Description

Accessible STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, and Mathematics) education is imperative in creating the future innovators of the world. This business proposal is for a K-8 STEAM Museum to be

Accessible STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, and Mathematics) education is imperative in creating the future innovators of the world. This business proposal is for a K-8 STEAM Museum to be built in the Novus Innovation Corridor on Arizona State University (ASU)’s Tempe campus. The museum will host dynamic spaces that are constantly growing and evolving as exhibits are built by interdisciplinary capstone student groups- creating an internal capstone project pipeline. The intention of the museum is to create an interactive environment that fosters curiosity and creativity while acting as supplemental learning material to Arizona K-8 curriculum. The space intends to serve the greater Phoenix area community and will cater to underrepresented audiences through the development of accessible education rooted in equality and inclusivity.

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  • 2020-05

An Analysis of Museums Using the Contextual Model of Learning to Aid in the Development of STEAMtank at ASU

Description

Researchers John H. Falk and Lynn D. Dierking developed what they call the Contextual Model of Learning in their 2012 publication, The Museum Experience Revisited. This model emphasizes the significance

Researchers John H. Falk and Lynn D. Dierking developed what they call the Contextual Model of Learning in their 2012 publication, The Museum Experience Revisited. This model emphasizes the significance of the visitor experience in the museum industry and is defined as three interconnected contexts that constitute a museum visitor’s experience. These contexts are the personal context, the sociocultural context, and the physical context. Falk and Dierking argue that all three contexts must be properly acknowledged by the museum for a positive visitor experience. They also provide readers with several recommendations on effective design strategies that fit within the principles of the Contextual Model of Learning. In this analysis, these principles are related directly to museums today. The Field Museum in Chicago and The Children’s Museum of Phoenix are noted for having exceptional websites. The Royal Ontario Museum and the Asian Art Museum are mentioned for having engaging marketing strategies. The Black Country Living Museum in the United Kingdom and the Museum of Modern Art in New York are recognized for innovative social media use. The USS Midway Museum in San Diego and the Musical Instrument Museum in Phoenix are acknowledged for their excellent designs, media usage in exhibits, and accessibility options. The British Museum in London is mentioned for its virtual experiences and gift shop. The Metropolitan Museum of Art is also mentioned for its gift shop. The Arizona Science Center and the Children’s Museum of Indianapolis are commended for their programs. Finally, a brief discussion is done on STEAMtank, a museum experience in development at Arizona State University, and how the principles within the Contextual Model of Learning are being integrated in similar fashion to the other museums discussed.

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Date Created
  • 2021-05

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Revival: Memory and Nostalgia in Contemporary Art

Description

Many contemporary artists have turned to the past in order to negotiate and make sense of their relationship with the present. Similarly, museums have begun to look back in order

Many contemporary artists have turned to the past in order to negotiate and make sense of their relationship with the present. Similarly, museums have begun to look back in order to push forward and through a revisionist lens they scrutinize their collections and reveal ignored object histories. A prominent method some museums implement is allowing contemporary artists to comb through the vaults and present new relationships between their objects to their visitors. Through a psychological analysis of memory, and theorists’ dissection of nostalgia, object agency, and contemporaneity, I argue that artists Spencer Finch, Do Ho Suh, Newsha Tavakolian, Solmaz Daryani, Malekeh Nayiny, Mitra Tabrizian, Mark Dion, Fred Wilson, and Gala Porras-Kim function as revivalists – or artists whose works use memory and nostalgia to bring the past back to life. By attempting to retrieve memories, create nostalgic experiences, and question histories, they make their works tools for remembrance, reconciliation, and renegotiation with the past and present. The concerns these artists bring to the surface through their works build an understanding of how memory and nostalgia function as devices for personal meaning-making, trauma processing, and human-object relationship building.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020

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Entering sacred ground: public history at the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum

Description

Baseball is the quintessential American game. To understand the country one must also understand the role baseball played in the nation's maturation process. Embedded in baseball's history are (among other

Baseball is the quintessential American game. To understand the country one must also understand the role baseball played in the nation's maturation process. Embedded in baseball's history are (among other things) the stories of America's struggles with issues of race, gender, immigration, organized labor, drug abuse, and rampant consumerism. Over the better part of two centuries, the national pastime both reflected changes to American culture and helped shape them as well. Documenting these changes and packaging them for consumption is the responsibility of the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum in Cooperstown, New York. Founded as a tourist attraction promoting largely patriotic values, in recent decades the Baseball Hall of Fame made a concerted effort to transform itself into a respected member of the history museum community--dedicated to displaying American history through the lens of baseball. This dissertation explores the evolution of the Baseball Hall of Fame from celebratory shrine to history museum through an analysis of public history practice within the museum. In particular, this study examines the ways the Hall both reflected and reinforced changes to American values and ideologies through the evolution of public history practice in the museum. The primary focus of this study is the museum's exhibits and analyzing what their content and presentation convey about the social climate during the various stages of the Baseball Hall of Fame's evolution. The principal resources utilized to identify these stages include promotional materials, exhibit reviews, periodicals, and photographic records, as well as interviews with past and present Hall-of-Fame staff. What this research uncovers is the story of an institution in the midst of a slow transition. Throughout the past half century, the Hall of Fame staff struggled with a variety of obstacles to change (including the museum's traditionally conservative roots, the unquestioning devotion Americans display for baseball and its mythology, and the Hall of Fame's idyllic setting in a quaint corner of small-town America) that undermined their efforts to become the type of socially relevant institution many envisioned. Contending with these challenges continues to characterize much of the museum's operations today.

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Date Created
  • 2013

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Engaging, educating, and evolving: a case study of three art museums in Arizona

Description

Art museums are institutions with a mission to not only preserve art and culture for the public, but to provide visitors with an educational experience. This qualitative case study includes

Art museums are institutions with a mission to not only preserve art and culture for the public, but to provide visitors with an educational experience. This qualitative case study includes three art museums in the Phoenix Metropolitan Area: a university art museum, a large public museum in Downtown Phoenix, and a contemporary art museum in the city of Scottsdale. This research study sought to identify the ways in which eight art museum employees from the education and administration departments identify their institutions as educational. Data was collected and analyzed through the methods of direct observations and field notes, one-on-one interviews, and photographs of educational programming.

After examining these art museums and conducting eight interviews, a description of each observation is displayed using examples of photographs and field notes. Although findings suggest a variety of educational programs for a range of visitors in each institution, all three museums offered comparable programs, activities, and events. This research study revealed similar ideas, themes, and perspectives between art museum educators and administrators. Findings indicate the importance of collaboration between both museum departments in order to ensure the success of their museums. All eight participants in the study had a passion for art and art museums as well as visitor education. Additionally, participants had concurrent thoughts in their interviews regarding concepts of educational programming, cultural diversity approaches, art museum fundamental roles, and overall educational goals.

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Date Created
  • 2018

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A comparative analysis of museums in Paris, Barcelona, and Phoenix

Description

The research titled “A Comparative Analysis of Museums in Paris, Barcelona,

and Phoenix” critically reviews six museums in three culturally diverse countries. This research looks at features within marketing, space, and

The research titled “A Comparative Analysis of Museums in Paris, Barcelona,

and Phoenix” critically reviews six museums in three culturally diverse countries. This research looks at features within marketing, space, and branding which may or may not differ depending on socio-cultural factors, histories, traditions, etc. in Spain, France, and the United States. A conclusion is formed around the identity of each museum through the variables of marketing, space, and branding.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016

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The ",field_main_title:"Art of Civilization: America on display at Peale's Museum

Description

In this thesis, I examine the inclusion of American Indians as museum subjects and participants in Charles Willson Peale's Philadelphia Museum. To determine the forces that informed Peale's curatorship, I

In this thesis, I examine the inclusion of American Indians as museum subjects and participants in Charles Willson Peale's Philadelphia Museum. To determine the forces that informed Peale's curatorship, I analyze Peale's experiences, personal views on education and scientific influences, specifically Carl Linnaeus, George-Louis Leclerc, Comte de Buffon and Thomas Jefferson. Peale created a polarized natural history narrative divided between Anglo-Americans and races that existed in a “natural state.” Within the museum's historical narrative, Peale presented Native individuals as either hostile enemies of the state or enlightened peacekeepers who accepted the supremacy of Americans. Peale's embrace of Native visitors demonstrated a mixture of racial tolerance and belief in racial hierarchy that also characterized democratic pedagogy. I derive the results by examining Peale's correspondence, diaries and public addresses, as well as administrative documents from the museum such as accession records, guidebooks, lectures and museum labels. I conclude that although Peale believed his museum succeeded in promoting tolerance and harmony among all cultures, his message nevertheless promoted prejudice through the exaltation of “civilized men.” By studying the social and intellectual constraints under which Peale operated, it is possible to see the extent to which observation of and commentary on ethnic and racial groups existed in America's earliest public culture and shaped early American museum history. Contemporary museums strive for cultural preservation and tolerance, therefore analysis of Peale's intentions and effects may increase the self-awareness of today's museum professionals.

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Date Created
  • 2015

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Culture in court: the saga of the Persepolis Tablets (a case study)

Description

This thesis explores the implications that the outcome of a certain U.S. lawsuit involving antiquities could have on practices and programs in the United States, related to cultural heritage and

This thesis explores the implications that the outcome of a certain U.S. lawsuit involving antiquities could have on practices and programs in the United States, related to cultural heritage and history. This paper examines the Rubin et al case, which sought to attach a collection of ancient Persian artifacts (known as The Persepolis Tablets) as a source of legal compensation. Presented as a case study, and using primary and secondary research sources, this paper analyzes the Rubin et al lawsuit and the factors that led to its initiation, and seeks to determine how and why adverse consequences could result from its final ruling. This thesis demonstrates that the final decision in the lawsuit could leave a negative impact on a number of practices related to cultural heritage in the United States, especially with regards to cultural and academic institutions such as museums and universities.

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Date Created
  • 2011

Museum networks: the exchange of the Smithsonian Institution's duplicate anthropology collections

Description

This dissertation examines a practice of scientific museums in the 19th and early 20th centuries: the exchange of their duplicate specimens. Specimen exchange facilitated the rise of universal museums while

This dissertation examines a practice of scientific museums in the 19th and early 20th centuries: the exchange of their duplicate specimens. Specimen exchange facilitated the rise of universal museums while creating a transnational network through which objects, knowledge, and museum practitioners circulated. My primary focus concerns the exchange of anthropological duplicate specimens at the Smithsonian Institution from 1880 to 1920. Specimen exchange was implemented as a strategic measure to quell the growth of scientific collections curated by the Smithsonian prior garnering to the broad political support needed to fund a national museum. My analysis examines how its practice was connected to both anthropological knowledge production, particularly in terms of diversifying the scope of museum collections, and knowledge dissemination. The latter includes an examination of how anthropological duplicates were used to illustrate competing explanations of culture change and generate interest in anthropological subject matter for non-specialist audiences. I examine the influence of natural history classification systems on museum-based anthropology by analyzing how the notion of duplicate was applied to collections of material culture. As the movement of museum objects are of particular concern to anthropologists involved in repatriation practices, I use specimen exchange to demonstrate that while keeping objects is a definitive function of the museum, an understanding of why and how museum objects have been kept or not kept in the past, particularly in terms of the intentions and value systems of curators, is critical in developing an ethically oriented dialogue about disposition of museum objects in the future.

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Date Created
  • 2014