Seeding the cloud: a study of an online career strategy course

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ABSTRACT The purpose of this study was to determine if a significant difference was found comparing posttest scores between students who took a career strategy course in a face-to-face (f2f)

ABSTRACT The purpose of this study was to determine if a significant difference was found comparing posttest scores between students who took a career strategy course in a face-to-face (f2f) format (n=156) and students who took the same course in a new online format (n=64). A review of literature pertaining to online learning, career services on college campuses, and career classes was provided. Data was collected via an action research design utilizing an intervention of an online delivery format. A quasi-experimental design allowed descriptive data to be collected which was analyzed by use of independent-samples t-tests, comparison of means, and frequency analysis to gain data pertinent to the research question. Quantitative results in four areas: posttest scores, pretest scores, learning gain, and course evaluation data were provided. Pretest and subgroup analysis were also utilized to add richness to the data. Results found that the career strategy course delivered in an online delivery format resulted in no significant differences in posttest scores when compared to the f2f delivery method posttest scores. This result is in agreement with the literature in online learning delivery formats compared to f2f delivery formats. The results of this study showed evidence to support the continuation of new iterations of the online delivery method for the career strategy course used in the study. Implications of these findings were discussed for the researcher's local community of practice, the larger community of practice, collegiate career services, as well as possibilities for future experimentation in career services and strategic career courses with other online formats in the future.