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Historians often characterize first ladies in the Progressive Era as representatives of the last vestiges of Victorian womanhood in an increasingly modern society. This dissertation argues that first ladies negotiated

Historians often characterize first ladies in the Progressive Era as representatives of the last vestiges of Victorian womanhood in an increasingly modern society. This dissertation argues that first ladies negotiated an image of themselves that fulfilled both traditional and modern notions of womanhood. In crafting these images, first ladies constructed images of their celebrity selves that were uniquely modern. Thus, images of first ladies in the Progressive Era show them as modest and feminine but also autonomous, intelligent, and capable.

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    Date Created
    • 2011
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  • Text
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    • Partial requirement for: Ph. D., Arizona State University, 2011
      Note type
      thesis
    • Includes bibliographical references (p. 260-270)
      Note type
      bibliography
    • Field of study: History

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    by Jill Horohoe

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