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Marine harvesters face significant livelihood challenges due to the impacts of climate change on marine ecosystems, and due to economic fluctuations that influence their incomes. In this study, we demonstrate

Marine harvesters face significant livelihood challenges due to the impacts of climate change on marine ecosystems, and due to economic fluctuations that influence their incomes. In this study, we demonstrate vulnerability as a product of the interactions among marine harvesters, government and buyers. We combined Elinor Ostrom's attention to the influence of institutions on resource exploitation, with political ecology's attention to perceptions of agency, and the contribution of justice and equity to measuring the success of institutions.

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  • 2014-10-20
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    • NOTICE: this is the author's version of a work that was accepted for publication in Applied Geography. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Applied Geography, Volume 59, May 2015. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0143622814002604, opens in a new window

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    This is a suggested citation. Consult the appropriate style guide for specific citation guidelines.

    llain J. Barnett, Hallie C. Eakin, “We and us, not I and me”: Justice, social capital, and household vulnerability in a Nova Scotia fishery, Applied Geography, Volume 59, May 2015, Pages 107-116, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.apgeog.2014.11.005.

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