Description

We show that a chemostat community of bacteria and bacteriophage in which bacteria compete for a single nutrient and for which the bipartite infection network is perfectly nested is permanent,

We show that a chemostat community of bacteria and bacteriophage in which bacteria compete for a single nutrient and for which the bipartite infection network is perfectly nested is permanent, a.k.a. uniformly persistent, provided that bacteria that are superior competitors for nutrient devote the least effort to defence against infection and the virus that are the most efficient at infecting host have the smallest host range. This confirms an earlier work of Jover et al. (J. Theor. Biol. 332:65–77, 2013) who raised the issue of whether nested infection networks are permanent.

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Date Created
  • 2015-02-01
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  • Text
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    Identifier
    • Digital object identifier: 10.1007/s12080-014-0236-6
    • Identifier Type
      International standard serial number
      Identifier Value
      1874-1738
    • Identifier Type
      International standard serial number
      Identifier Value
      1874-1746
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    Korytowski, Daniel A., & Smith, Hal L. (2015). How nested and monogamous infection networks in host-phage communities come to be. THEORETICAL ECOLOGY, 8(1), 111-120. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12080-014-0236-6

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