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Background
The majority of emerging infectious diseases are zoonotic (transmissible between animals and humans) in origin, and therefore integrated surveillance of disease events in humans and animals has been recommended

Background
The majority of emerging infectious diseases are zoonotic (transmissible between animals and humans) in origin, and therefore integrated surveillance of disease events in humans and animals has been recommended to support effective global response to disease emergence. While in the past decade there has been extensive global surveillance for highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) infection in both animals and humans, there have been few attempts to compare these data streams and evaluate the utility of such integration.
Methodology

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    Date Created
    • 2012-09-27
    Resource Type
  • Text
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    Identifier
    • Digital object identifier: 10.1371/journal.pone.0043851
    • Identifier Type
      International standard serial number
      Identifier Value
      1045-3830
    • Identifier Type
      International standard serial number
      Identifier Value
      1939-1560

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    Rabinowitz, P. M., Galusha, D., Vegso, S., Michalove, J., Rinne, S., Scotch, M., & Kane, M. (2012). Comparison of Human and Animal Surveillance Data for H5N1 Influenza A in Egypt 2006–2011. PLoS ONE, 7(9). doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0043851

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