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In the nineteenth century, smallpox ravaged through the United States and Canada. At this time, a botanical preparation, derived from the carnivorous plant Sarracenia purpurea, was proclaimed as being a

In the nineteenth century, smallpox ravaged through the United States and Canada. At this time, a botanical preparation, derived from the carnivorous plant Sarracenia purpurea, was proclaimed as being a successful therapy for smallpox infections. The work described characterizes the antipoxvirus activity associated with this botanical extract against vaccinia virus, monkeypox virus and variola virus, the causative agent of smallpox.

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    Date Created
    • 2012-03-09
    Resource Type
  • Text
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    Identifier
    • Digital object identifier: 10.1371/journal.pone.0032610
    • Identifier Type
      International standard serial number
      Identifier Value
      1045-3830
    • Identifier Type
      International standard serial number
      Identifier Value
      1939-1560

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    Arndt, W., Mitnik, C., Denzler, K. L., White, S., Waters, R., Jacobs, B. L., . . . Langland, J. O. (2012). In Vitro Characterization of a Nineteenth-Century Therapy for Smallpox. PLoS ONE, 7(3). doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0032610

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