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At least since the late nineteenth century, researchers have sought an explanation for infantile amnesia (IA)—the lack of autobiographical memories dating from early childhood—and childhood amnesia (CA), faster forgetting of

At least since the late nineteenth century, researchers have sought an explanation for infantile amnesia (IA)—the lack of autobiographical memories dating from early childhood—and childhood amnesia (CA), faster forgetting of events up until the age of about seven. Evidence suggests that IA occurs across altricial species, and a number of studies using animal models have converged on the hypothesis that maturation of the hippocampus is an important factor. But why does the hippocampus mature at one time and not another, and how does that maturation relate to memory?

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    Date Created
    • 2016-01-25
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  • Text
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    Identifier
    • Digital object identifier: 10.3389/fpsyg.2016.00010
    • Identifier Type
      International standard serial number
      Identifier Value
      1664-1078

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    Glenberg, A. M., & Hayes, J. (2016). Contribution of Embodiment to Solving the Riddle of Infantile Amnesia. Frontiers in Psychology, 7. doi:10.3389/fpsyg.2016.00010

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