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Soliman et al. (2013) set out to demonstrate how the bodily level of analysis can unify explanations in psychology. Our argument was that common sensorimotor mechanisms underlie many of the

Soliman et al. (2013) set out to demonstrate how the bodily level of analysis can unify explanations in psychology. Our argument was that common sensorimotor mechanisms underlie many of the behavioral phenomena that are currently segregated as cognitive, social, or cultural. Toward that end, we re-characterized a cultural construct—self-construal along the dimension of independence and interdependence (Markus and Kitayama, 1991)—as reflecting degree of interaction with ethnically diverse others.

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    Date Created
    • 2014-06-04
    Resource Type
  • Text
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    Identifier
    • Digital object identifier: 10.3389/fpsyg.2014.00513
    • Identifier Type
      International standard serial number
      Identifier Value
      1664-1078

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    Soliman, T. M., & Glenberg, A. M. (2014). How intent to interact can affect action scaling of distance: reply to Wilson. Frontiers in Psychology, 5. doi:10.3389/fpsyg.2014.00513

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