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Past research has found a robust effect of prejudice against atheists in largely Christian-dominated (belief-oriented) samples. We propose that religious centrality of beliefs vs. practices influences attitudes toward atheists, such

Past research has found a robust effect of prejudice against atheists in largely Christian-dominated (belief-oriented) samples. We propose that religious centrality of beliefs vs. practices influences attitudes toward atheists, such that religious groups emphasizing beliefs perceive non-believers more negatively than believers, while groups emphasizing practices perceive non-practicing individuals more negatively than practicing individuals.

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    Date Created
    • 2015-09-08
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  • Text
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    Identifier
    • Digital object identifier: 10.3389/fpsyg.2015.01352
    • Identifier Type
      International standard serial number
      Identifier Value
      1664-1078

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    Hughes, J., Grossmann, I., & Cohen, A. B. (2015). Tolerating the “doubting Thomas”: how centrality of religious beliefs vs. practices influences prejudice against atheists. Frontiers in Psychology, 6. doi:10.3389/fpsyg.2015.01352

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