Towards learning compact visual embeddings using deep neural networks

Document
Description

Feature embeddings differ from raw features in the sense that the former obey certain properties like notion of similarity/dissimilarity in it's embedding space. word2vec is a preeminent example in this

Feature embeddings differ from raw features in the sense that the former obey certain properties like notion of similarity/dissimilarity in it's embedding space. word2vec is a preeminent example in this direction, where the similarity in the embedding space is measured in terms of the cosine similarity. Such language embedding models have seen numerous applications in both language and vision community as they capture the information in the modality (English language) efficiently. Inspired by these language models, this work focuses on learning embedding spaces for two visual computing tasks, 1. Image Hashing 2. Zero Shot Learning. The training set was used to learn embedding spaces over which similarity/dissimilarity is measured using several distance metrics like hamming / euclidean / cosine distances. While the above-mentioned language models learn generic word embeddings, in this work task specific embeddings were learnt which can be used for Image Retrieval and Classification separately.

Image Hashing is the task of mapping images to binary codes such that some notion of user-defined similarity is preserved. The first part of this work focuses on designing a new framework that uses the hash-tags associated with web images to learn the binary codes. Such codes can be used in several applications like Image Retrieval and Image Classification. Further, this framework requires no labelled data, leaving it very inexpensive. Results show that the proposed approach surpasses the state-of-art approaches by a significant margin.

Zero-shot classification is the task of classifying the test sample into a new class which was not seen during training. This is possible by establishing a relationship between the training and the testing classes using auxiliary information. In the second part of this thesis, a framework is designed that trains using the handcrafted attribute vectors and word vectors but doesn’t require the expensive attribute vectors during test time. More specifically, an intermediate space is learnt between the word vector space and the image feature space using the hand-crafted attribute vectors. Preliminary results on two zero-shot classification datasets show that this is a promising direction to explore.