Feasibility of Using a Non-Counter Movement Squat to Assess Lower Body Strength in Adults Ages 20-70 years.

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The purpose of this study was to investigate the Feasibility of Using a Non-Counter Movement Squat to Assess Lower Body Strength in Adults ages 20-70 years. Feasibility was tested by

The purpose of this study was to investigate the Feasibility of Using a Non-Counter Movement Squat to Assess Lower Body Strength in Adults ages 20-70 years. Feasibility was tested by measuring five feasibility metrics described by Bowen et al. (Bowen et al., 2009): Acceptability, Demand, Implementation, Practicality, and Limited Efficacy. Seven male subjects and fifteen female subjects participated in the study. The subjects had their height, weight, body fat percentage by bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA), and grip strength measured. Subjects performed a warm-up on a cycle ergometer, a Non-Counter Movement Squat Test (NCMST) 1-repetition maximal strength test using a Smith machine, and a cool down on a treadmill. Each subject then completed a post-participation questionnaire used to measure acceptability, Demand was measured by subjects who agreed to participate, implementation was measured by subjects who completed the protocol, practicality was measured by an administrator survey, and limited efficacy was measured by distribution of strength results by age and for all subjects by sex. Results showed acceptance of hypotheses of acceptability, demand, implementation and practicality for both males and females. Limited efficacy was inconclusive for both males and females resulting in rejection of hypothesis. The findings of this study show that further research is needed to compare the NCMST to other lower body muscular strength tests to determine the validity of the NCMST.