Performance Enhancement of Power System Operation and Planning through Advanced Advisory Mechanisms

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This research develops decision support mechanisms for power system operation and planning practices. Contemporary industry practices rely on deterministic approaches to approximate system conditions and handle growing uncertainties from renewable

This research develops decision support mechanisms for power system operation and planning practices. Contemporary industry practices rely on deterministic approaches to approximate system conditions and handle growing uncertainties from renewable resources. The primary purpose of this research is to identify soft spots of the contemporary industry practices and propose innovative algorithms, methodologies, and tools to improve economics and reliability in power systems.

First, this dissertation focuses on transmission thermal constraint relaxation practices. Most system operators employ constraint relaxation practices, which allow certain constraints to be relaxed for penalty prices, in their market models. A proper selection of penalty prices is imperative due to the influence that penalty prices have on generation scheduling and market settlements. However, penalty prices are primarily decided today based on stakeholder negotiations or system operator’s judgments. There is little to no methodology or engineered approach around the determination of these penalty prices. This work proposes new methods that determine the penalty prices for thermal constraint relaxations based on the impact overloading can have on the residual life of the line. This study evaluates the effectiveness of the proposed methods in the short-term operational planning and long-term transmission expansion planning studies.

The second part of this dissertation investigates an advanced methodology to handle uncertainties associated with high penetration of renewable resources, which poses new challenges to power system reliability and calls attention to include stochastic modeling within resource scheduling applications. However, the inclusion of stochastic modeling within mathematical programs has been a challenge due to computational complexities. Moreover, market design issues due to the stochastic market environment make it more challenging. Given the importance of reliable and affordable electric power, such a challenge to advance existing deterministic resource scheduling applications is critical. This ongoing and joint research attempts to overcome these hurdles by developing a stochastic look-ahead commitment tool, which is a stand-alone advisory tool. This dissertation contributes to the derivation of a mathematical formulation for the extensive form two-stage stochastic programming model, the utilization of Progressive Hedging decomposition algorithm, and the initial implementation of the Progressive Hedging subproblem along with various heuristic strategies to enhance the computational performance.