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Children with dyslexia have difficulty learning to read. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the use of simultaneous multisensory structured language (multisensory) instruction promoted better letter name

Children with dyslexia have difficulty learning to read. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the use of simultaneous multisensory structured language (multisensory) instruction promoted better letter name and sound production, word reading, and word spelling for second grade children with typical development (TD; N=6) or with dyslexia (DYS; N=5) than structured language instruction alone. The use of non-English graphemes (letters) to represent two pretend languages were used to control for children’s lexical knowledge.

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    Date Created
    • 2016
    Resource Type
  • Text
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    Note
    • Partial requirement for: Ph.D., Arizona State University, 2016
      Note type
      thesis
    • Includes bibliographical references
      Note type
      bibliography
    • Field of study: Speech and hearing science

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    by Nora Wersich Schlesinger

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