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At the beginning of the nineteenth century, there was no universal term to describe a person who practiced science. In 1833, the term “scientist” was proposed to recognize these individuals,

At the beginning of the nineteenth century, there was no universal term to describe a person who practiced science. In 1833, the term “scientist” was proposed to recognize these individuals, but exactly who was represented by this term was still ambiguous. Supported by Bruno Latour’s theory of networks and hybridity, The Emerging Scientist takes a historical approach to analyze the different collectives of individuals who influenced the cultural perception of science and therefore aided in defining the role of the emerging scientist during the nineteenth century.

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    Date Created
    • 2016
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  • Text
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    • Partial requirement for: Ph.D., Arizona State University, 2016
      Note type
      thesis
    • Includes bibliographical references (pages 249-262)
      Note type
      bibliography
    • Field of study: English

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    by Kaitlin Southerly

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