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The rise of print book culture in sixteenth-century England had profound effects on understandings of identity that are reflected in the prose, poetry, and drama of the age. Drawing

The rise of print book culture in sixteenth-century England had profound effects on understandings of identity that are reflected in the prose, poetry, and drama of the age. Drawing on assemblage and actor-network theory, this dissertation argues that models of identity constructed in relation to books in Renaissance England are neither static nor self-contained, arising instead out of a collaborative engagement with books as physical objects that tap into historically specific cultural discourses.

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    Date Created
    • 2015
    Resource Type
  • Text
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    • Partial requirement for: Ph. D., Arizona State University, 2015
      Note type
      thesis
    • Includes bibliographical references (pages 219-245)
      Note type
      bibliography
    • Field of study: English

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    by John Henry Adams

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