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Residential historic preservation occurs through inhabitation. Through day-to-day domesticities a suite of bodily comportments and aesthetic practices are perpetually at work tearing and stitching the historic fabric anew. Such paradoxical

Residential historic preservation occurs through inhabitation. Through day-to-day domesticities a suite of bodily comportments and aesthetic practices are perpetually at work tearing and stitching the historic fabric anew. Such paradoxical practice materializes seemingly incompatible relations between past and present, people and things. Through a playful posture of experience/experiment, this dissertation attends to the materiality of historic habitation vis-à-vis practices and performances in the Coronado historic neighborhood (1907-1942) in Phoenix, Arizona.

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    Date Created
    • 2013
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  • Text
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    • Partial requirement for: Ph.D., Arizona State University, 2013
      Note type
      thesis
    • Includes bibliographical references (p. 149-163)
      Note type
      bibliography
    • Field of study: Geography

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    by Jennifer Lynn Kitson

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