Description

Saying, "if Mary had watered Sam's plant, it wouldn't have died," is an ordinary way to identify Mary not watering Sam's plant as the cause of its death. But there

Saying, "if Mary had watered Sam's plant, it wouldn't have died," is an ordinary way to identify Mary not watering Sam's plant as the cause of its death. But there are problems with this statement. If we identify Mary's omitted action as the cause, we seemingly admit an inordinate number of omissions as causes. For any counterfactual statement containing the omitted action is true (e.g. if Hillary Clinton had watered Sam's plant, it wouldn't have died).

Reuse Permissions
  • 396.21 KB application/pdf

    Download count: 0

    Details

    Contributors
    Date Created
    • 2013
    Resource Type
  • Text
  • Collections this item is in
    Note
    • Partial requirement for: M.A., Arizona State University, 2013
      Note type
      thesis
    • Includes bibliographical references (p. 61-64)
      Note type
      bibliography
    • Field of study: Philosophy

    Citation and reuse

    Statement of Responsibility

    by Paul Henne

    Machine-readable links