Description

This dissertation examines U. S. American intergenerational witnesses to the Holocaust, particularly how addressees turned addressors maintain an ethical obligation to First Generation witnesses while creating an affective relation to

This dissertation examines U. S. American intergenerational witnesses to the Holocaust, particularly how addressees turned addressors maintain an ethical obligation to First Generation witnesses while creating an affective relation to this history for new generations. In response to revisionism and the incommunicability of the Holocaust, a focus on (accurate) First Generation testimony emerged that marginalizes that of intergenerational witnesses. The risk of such a position is that it paralyzes language, locking the addressee into a movement always into the past.

Reuse Permissions
  • 621.29 KB application/pdf

    Download count: 0

    Details

    Contributors
    Date Created
    • 2012
    Resource Type
  • Text
  • Collections this item is in
    Note
    • Partial requirement for: Ph. D., Arizona State University, 2012
      Note type
      thesis
    • Includes bibliographical references (p. 211-219)
      Note type
      bibliography
    • Field of study: English

    Citation and reuse

    Statement of Responsibility

    by Sarah C. Dean

    Machine-readable links