Matching Items (16)

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Questioning the Man in the Glass Booth: Analyzing Depictions of the Eichmann Trial

Description

The thesis explores the trial of the Nazi war criminal Adolf Eichmann, which occurred in Jerusalem in 1961. In order to do this, the thesis analyzes four sources—two films and

The thesis explores the trial of the Nazi war criminal Adolf Eichmann, which occurred in Jerusalem in 1961. In order to do this, the thesis analyzes four sources—two films and two books—that exist as representations of and responses to the historic trial. My analyses investigate the role of the witnesses who offered testimony during the trial and the sentencing that occurred at the trial’s conclusion, which are two major aspects of the trial. By comparing the way that various witnesses, who appear in multiple representations of the trial, are portrayed, the thesis will make conclusions regarding the way that each source utilizes the witness testimony. In order to evaluate the way each source presents the sentencing of the trial, the thesis uses Yasco Horsman’s concepts of the constative and performative aspects of judgement. The thesis concludes by discussing the value that each of these works has as a representation of the Holocaust. Ultimately, as time distances the modern generation from the events of the Holocaust and post-Holocaust trials, the need for such representations as the four examined in this thesis continues to grow in importance.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

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Herzog History

Description

Herzog History is a retelling of the Holocaust escape of Godofredo Herzog and his family. This thesis project aims to provide a family history for the Herzog family, as well

Herzog History is a retelling of the Holocaust escape of Godofredo Herzog and his family. This thesis project aims to provide a family history for the Herzog family, as well as a Holocaust story that you don't typically see, in a different way than a documentary or book. The creator took a journey with her grandfather to retrace the escape through the cities he and his family lived in. She used her knowledge in videography, editing and website development she gained from the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication to create this project. There are many stories of Holocaust survivors, but this one is a personal history that impacts her family. The project comes in the form of a website with photos, journal entries and an interactive map. Website link: https://isabelgreenblatt.wixsite.com/herzoghistory

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Created

Date Created
  • 2017-12

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"How Do We Forgive Our Fathers?": The Generational Trauma Model and Native Peoples, Issues, Similarities and Applications

Description

During the 1970's to 90's, scholars in the fields of Jewish Studies, anthropology and sociology (notably, Hellen Epstein, Larry Langer and Yosef Yerushalmi), developed the idea of generational trauma theory,

During the 1970's to 90's, scholars in the fields of Jewish Studies, anthropology and sociology (notably, Hellen Epstein, Larry Langer and Yosef Yerushalmi), developed the idea of generational trauma theory, when analyzing the trauma inflicted upon European Jewish populations during the Holocaust. Epstein argues that trauma is passed down from generation to generation, while Langer argues that the second generation interprets the trauma in their own way. Other important terms in trauma theory include liturgical time, sites of memory, historical trauma and the historical trauma response. Scholars who analyze American Indian communities, like Yellow Horse Brave Heart and Durran/Durran, readily took up this theory, applying it to the Native American experience. One area where this theory has been applied to is the Native American Boarding School experience. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the efficacy of applying the post-Holocaust trauma theory to the Native American boarding school experience. In order to determine the effectiveness of the boarding schools, one must analyze the boarding school experience, beginning at the philosophical underpinnings of the boarding school, and then discussing the impacts that the boarding schools had on the students and finally, the impact that this had on the second generation. However, this approach has a number of flaws, such as the differences between native communities and post-Holocaust, American, Jewish communities, as discussed in the Philosophy of American Indian Studies. The length of the boarding schools was also longer than the length of the Holocaust. The fact that Native Americans faced repeated trauma, in a way that post-Holocaust American Jews did not. The trauma also changed for both native peoples and post-Holocaust Jews, making it difficult for there to be a single response to trauma. The philosophical bases of the Holocaust and boarding schools were also different. The post-Holocaust generational trauma approach also has a number of applications to native peoples. This includes the psychological aspect of trauma. The use of terminology by native scholars. Native peoples also developed concepts like sites of memory and liturgical time. Finally, both the post-Holocaust Jewas and Native Americans have used trauma for political ends. The conclusion is that post-Holocaust generational trauma theory has some applications to native peoples, but the application is limited. A scholar must take into careful consideration the native peoples who they are working with.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2017-12

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More Than a Textbook: The Impact of Survivors on Holocaust Education

Description

This project explores the importance of Holocaust education, and the need for a balance of survivor testimony and history in order to effectively educate students and inspire action. At the

This project explores the importance of Holocaust education, and the need for a balance of survivor testimony and history in order to effectively educate students and inspire action. At the center of the analysis is the role of the survivor's testimony in the education process. The project discusses the use of Holocaust survivor testimony, and the problems with Holocaust survivor testimony, and how the intersection of oral testimony and education can successfully be utilized to introduce an emotional component in historical education. Holocaust survivors are passing away, and the current generation of students will most likely be the last to have the opportunity to directly interact with a Holocaust survivor. Students need to learn the important lessons that only Holocaust survivors can teach. The project consists of a research paper, journal, and documentary, and all three of these elements work together to communicate the importance of Holocaust survivors and Holocaust education. The core lessons learned from Holocaust survivors and Holocaust education cannot only be applied to better understand the Holocaust, but also to better understand past and current genocides.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05

From the Holocaust to the Rwanda Genocide: Development and Effectiveness of Human Rights Law

Description

In the aftermath of the Second World War and global atrocities that occurred during the Nazi Holocaust, the international community established the United Nations and developed the Universal Declaration of

In the aftermath of the Second World War and global atrocities that occurred during the Nazi Holocaust, the international community established the United Nations and developed the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The UN legally defined the term genocide with the development of the Convention for the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide in an attempt to deter future genocides from occurring. These are now the governing documents for international human rights law and genocide prevention. Since the development of these documents, however, human rights violations and genocides have continued to occur around the world. In 1994, Rwandan Hutus murdered more than one million Tutsis in the span of one hundred days. Following the genocide, the United Nations developed the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda in which the conviction of Jean-Paul Akayesu established the first trial where an international tribunal was called upon to interpret the definition of genocide as defined in the Convention for the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide. Although the human rights movement has created greater deterrence for human rights crimes, punished perpetrators for their crimes, and established norms for the treatment of human beings, global human rights violations and genocides continue to occur. This project attempts to explore the presence of possible factors in pre-genocidal nations that may predict whether a nation could spiral into genocide and what mechanisms could counter their presence.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05

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Holocaust & Tolerance Museum Website

Description

Link to website project: http://cacoope6.wix.com/tolerancemuseum The East Valley Jewish Community Center is working to build a Holocaust & Tolerance Museum adjacent to their community center campus in Chandler. As

Link to website project: http://cacoope6.wix.com/tolerancemuseum The East Valley Jewish Community Center is working to build a Holocaust & Tolerance Museum adjacent to their community center campus in Chandler. As a sophomore in college I was introduced to the EVJCC and this project when I saw two Holocaust survivors who lived through Sobibor death camp speak at an EVJCC event. After that, I looked for more information online, only to find none. A series of conversations with Steve Tepper of the EVJCC later, we decided on a project - a website that would be easy for him to maintain after I passed it over when my thesis was complete. I spent a little over a year gathering materials for this project and familiarizing myself with the people and projects involved. In addition to my own original materials, I used a collection of materials I was given access to by Steve Tepper, including filmed interviews with survivors, a documentary, news stories and more. I attended events, took my own photos, talked with Holocaust survivors and learned more about the museum itself, which will be a museum not only to commemorate the Holocaust but genocide and persecution around the globe. When it came time to make the website, I chose Wix as the medium because it was something I could make to the EVJCC's standards and specifications with my own original touches and flair, and something they could easily take over and update after I pass it along. The final product is a beginning website to help them get started with their online presence as a museum.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

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French Jewish Emigration, the United States, and the Second World War

Description

At odds with the Axis powers in the Second World War, the American government
began the task of dealing with an influx of Europeans seeking refugee status stateside, even before

At odds with the Axis powers in the Second World War, the American government
began the task of dealing with an influx of Europeans seeking refugee status stateside, even before the Japanese attack Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. American interest in the global situation, nevertheless, did not officially begin after the initial attack on the 7th of December. Before that date, the United States government had to address refugees seeking asylum from European countries. Often studied, German emigration to the United States at times took center stage in terms of the refugee situation after the Nazi regime enacted anti- Semitic legislation in Germany and its occupied nations, prior to the American declaration of war. France, however, had a crisis of its own after the Germans invaded in the summer of 1940, and the fall of France led to a large portion of France occupied by Germany and the formation of a new government in the non-occupied zone, the Vichy regime.
France had an extensive history of Jewish culture and citizenship culture prior to 1940, and xenophobia, especially common after the 1941 National Revolution in France, led to a “France for the French” mentality championed by Marshal Philippe Pétain, Chief of State of Vichy France. The need for the French Jewish population to seek emigration became a reality in the face of the collaborationist Vichy government and anti-Semitic statutes enacted in 1940 and 1941. French anti-Semitic policies and practices led many Jews to seek asylum in the United States, though American policy was divided between a small segment of government officials, politicians, individuals, and Jewish relief groups who wanted to aid European Jews, and a more powerful nativist faction, led by Breckenridge Long which did not support immigration. President Roosevelt, and the American government, fully aware of the situation of French Jews, did little concrete to aid their asylum in the United States.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05

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FORGOTTEN VOICES: THE LIVES, DEATHS, AND WORKS OF FOUR THERESIENSTADT COMPOSERS

Description

Prior to World War II, about 55,000 Jews were living in Prague, a very cosmopolitan and artistic city. They represented nearly twenty percent of the city’s population. By the end

Prior to World War II, about 55,000 Jews were living in Prague, a very cosmopolitan and artistic city. They represented nearly twenty percent of the city’s population. By the end of the war, at least two-thirds of them had died in the Holocaust. The Nazis converted the small fortress town of Theresienstadt, near Prague, into a transport camp for Jews on their way to Auschwitz and other death camps. Theresienstadt was where the Nazis sent most Jewish Czech intellectuals, military veterans, artists, and members of the upper class who were well connected. It was also the camp they chose to present to the international community. For all of these reasons—Theresienstadt’s isolation, the demography of the inmates there, and the Nazis’ desire to use it to fool the international community—the Nazis allowed unparalleled self-administration and artistic freedoms.
Arguably the most noteworthy result was its flourishing musical community. Composers and performers who had worked together in Prague prior to the war were able to continue to do so freely in ways that Jewish people were not allowed anywhere else in occupied Europe. They kept the musicians in Theresienstadt—delaying their deportations to Auschwitz—longer than almost anyone else in the camp, until the threat of Soviet liberation was imminent. This thesis aims to explore the lives and works of four Theresienstadt composers: Viktor Ullmann, Pavel Haas, Gideon Klein, and Hans Krása. All four of these artists were successful prior to the war, spent time in Theresienstadt, and were sent to Auschwitz on the same transport on October 16, 1944. Three of the four died in the gas chambers of Auschwitz, and Klein was sent on to the Fürstengrube concentration camp, where he was shot and killed in January 1945. These composers and their music should be remembered, studied, and performed, not only for historical and moral reasons, but also for artistic ones. Their works represent some of the finest music in the German tradition written during this period. In conjunction with this paper, I have arranged Gideon Klein’s String Trio—one of the pieces profiled here—for saxophone quartet. Members of the Arizona State University saxophone studio will perform it twice in April. I hope that the performances will help make audiences aware of the strength of the music that came out of Theresienstadt, and reinforce the fact that it remains highly relevant. In this thesis, the composers’ careers before and during their time in Theresienstadt will be traced, as well as the measures they took to preserve their music, their interactions with each other, and their efforts to use hidden messages in their music. It is hoped that this document will help fill an important gap in the history of European music in the twentieth century.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013-05

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Echoes of Trauma: Trauma Transmission in Holocaust Survivors and Their Children

Description

"Trauma transmission" in Holocaust Studies represents a cross-disciplinary method of studying history that focuses on how particular events impact individuals rather than on the events themselves. It refers to the

"Trauma transmission" in Holocaust Studies represents a cross-disciplinary method of studying history that focuses on how particular events impact individuals rather than on the events themselves. It refers to the transfer of trauma or its symptoms from Holocaust survivors to children of survivors (COS). In this project, I explore "echoes of trauma," such as an obsession with food or inability to show emotion, in Holocaust survivors and COS that they directly attribute to Holocaust experiences

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05

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What We Don’t Talk About When We Talk About Anne Frank: Re-Forming Holocaust Memory Through The Fictional Narratives of Cynthia Ozick, Philip Roth, and Nathan Englander

Description

This thesis analyzes the unsettling presence of the Holocaust in Cynthia Ozick’s The Shawl (1980), Philip Roth’s The Ghost Writer (1979), and Nathan Englander’s What We Talk About When We

This thesis analyzes the unsettling presence of the Holocaust in Cynthia Ozick’s The Shawl (1980), Philip Roth’s The Ghost Writer (1979), and Nathan Englander’s What We Talk About When We Talk About Anne Frank (2013). Characters in these texts struggle to maintain a stable sense of what it means to be Jewish in America outside of a relationship to the Holocaust. This leaves the characters only able to form negative associations about what it means to live with the memory of the Holocaust or to over-identify so heavily with the memory that they can’t lead a normal life. These authors construct a re-formed memory of the Holocaust in ways that prompt a new focus on how permanently intertwined the Holocaust and Jewish identity are. In this context, re-formed means the way Jewish American writers have reconstructed the connection between Jewish identity and its relation to the Holocaust in ways that highlight issues of over-identification and negative identity associations.

By pushing past the trope of unspeakability that often surrounds the Holocaust, these authors construct a re-formed memory that allows for the formation of Jewish American identity as permanently bound with constant Holocaust preoccupation, the memory of Anne Frank, and the Holocaust itself. The authors’ treatment of issues surrounding Jewish identity contribute to the genre of post-Holocaust literature, which focuses on re-forming the discussion about present day Jewish American connection to the Holocaust. Giving voice to the Holocaust in new ways provides an opportunity for current and future generations of Jewish Americans to again consider the continued importance of the Holocaust as a historical event within the Jewish community.

In a world that is once again becoming increasingly anti-semitic as a result of the current political climate, white supremacist riots, desecration of Jewish grave sites, and shootings at temples, the discussion that these texts open up is increasingly important and should remain at the forefront of American consciousness. The research in this thesis reveals that through the process of Holocaust memory constantly being re-formed through the work of these Jewish American authors, its continued influence on Jewish American culture is not forgotten.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020