Description

Recent studies suggest a role for the microbiota in autism spectrum disorders (ASD), potentially arising from their role in modulating the immune system and gastrointestinal (GI) function or from gut–brain

Recent studies suggest a role for the microbiota in autism spectrum disorders (ASD), potentially arising from their role in modulating the immune system and gastrointestinal (GI) function or from gut–brain interactions dependent or independent from the immune system. GI problems such as chronic constipation and/or diarrhea are common in children with ASD, and significantly worsen their behavior and their quality of life. Here we first summarize previously published data supporting that GI dysfunction is common in individuals with ASD and the role of the microbiota in ASD.

Reuse Permissions
  • 19.85 MB application/pdf

    Download count: 0

    Details

    Contributors
    Date Created
    • 2015-03-12
    Resource Type
  • Text
  • Collections this item is in
    Identifier
    • Digital object identifier: 10.3402/mehd.v26.26914
    • Identifier Type
      International standard serial number
      Identifier Value
      0891-060X
    • Identifier Type
      International standard serial number
      Identifier Value
      1651-2235
    Note

    Citation and reuse

    Cite this item

    This is a suggested citation. Consult the appropriate style guide for specific citation guidelines.

    Krajmalnik-Brown, R., Lozupone, C., Kang, D., & Adams, J. B. (2015). Gut bacteria in children with autism spectrum disorders: challenges and promise of studying how a complex community influences a complex disease. Microbial Ecology in Health & Disease, 26(0). doi:10.3402/mehd.v26.26914

    Machine-readable links