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There is substantial controversy over the extent to which social science should be used in jury selection. Underlying the debate are two competing interests in the make-up of a jury:

There is substantial controversy over the extent to which social science should be used in jury selection. Underlying the debate are two competing interests in the make-up of a jury: a privilege to strike prospective jurors on subjective grounds, which supports scientific jury selection, and a collective interest of citizens to be free from exclusion from jury service, which does not. While the incommensurability of the interests precludes resolution of the controversy in the abstract, specific solutions are possible.

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  • 2013
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  • Text
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    Girvan, E., Cramer, R.J., Titcomb, C., Neal, T.M.S., & Brodsky, S.L. (2013). The propriety of preemptory challenges for perceived personality traits. Law & Psychology Review, 37, 49-82.

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