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Description
The intervertebral disc goes through degenerative changes with age, which leads to disc thinning, bulging, or herniation. Spinal fusion treatments are ineffective as they cause quicker degeneration of adjacent discs and fail in nearly 20% of cases, so researchers have

The intervertebral disc goes through degenerative changes with age, which leads to disc thinning, bulging, or herniation. Spinal fusion treatments are ineffective as they cause quicker degeneration of adjacent discs and fail in nearly 20% of cases, so researchers have turned to tissue-engineering biocompatible intervertebral discs for transplantation. However novel and effective as this may seem, these transplanted discs still show evidence of degeneration after just 5 years. I hypothesize that these discs are degenerating due to a blockage of the cartilaginous endplates post-transplantation that is hindering nutrient transport through the intervertebral disc. In order to test this hypothesis, I developed a mathematical model of nutrient transport through the intervertebral disc in one diurnal daily loading cycle. This model was used to simulate open endplates and blocked endplates and then compare differences in nutrient concentration and nutrient transport to the center of the disc. Results from the math model simulations were then compared to in vitro experimental data collected in lab to verify the findings on a physiological level. Results showed significant differences, both in vitro and in the model, between nutrient transport in open endplates vs blocked endplates, lending support to the original hypothesis. This study only presents preliminary results, but could hold the key to preventing future disc degeneration post-transplantation.
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Details

Title
  • Diurnal Cycle Modeling of Nutrient Transport through the Intervertebral Disc to Prevent Future Degeneration after Transplantation
Contributors
Date Created
2015-05
Resource Type
  • Text
  • Machine-readable links