Description

The colonies of army ants and some other legionary ant species have single, permanently wingless queens with massive post petioles and large gasters. Such highly modified queens are called dichthadiigynes.

The colonies of army ants and some other legionary ant species have single, permanently wingless queens with massive post petioles and large gasters. Such highly modified queens are called dichthadiigynes. This paper presents the unusually rich exocrine gland endowment of dichthadiigynes, which is not found in queens of other ant species. It has been suggested these kinds of glands produce secretions that attract and maintain worker retinues around queens, especially during migration.

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Date Created
  • 2016-03-17
Resource Type
  • Text
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    Identifier
    • Digital object identifier: 10.1371/journal.pone.0151604
    • Identifier Type
      International standard serial number
      Identifier Value
      1045-3830
    • Identifier Type
      International standard serial number
      Identifier Value
      1939-1560

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    This is a suggested citation. Consult the appropriate style guide for specific citation guidelines.

    Hölldobler, B. (2016). Queen Specific Exocrine Glands in Legionary Ants and Their Possible Function in Sexual Selection. Plos One, 11(3). doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0151604

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