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Recent human population increase has been enabled by a massive expansion of global agricultural production. A key component of this “Green Revolution” has been application of inorganic fertilizers to produce

Recent human population increase has been enabled by a massive expansion of global agricultural production. A key component of this “Green Revolution” has been application of inorganic fertilizers to produce and maintain high crop yields. However, the long-term sustainability of these practices is unclear given the eutrophying effects of fertilizer runoff as well as the reliance of fertilizer production on finite non-renewable resources such as mined phosphate- and potassium-bearing rocks.

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    Date Created
    • 2014-05-01
    Resource Type
  • Text
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    Identifier
    • Digital object identifier: 10.1371/journal.pone.0093998
    • Identifier Type
      International standard serial number
      Identifier Value
      1045-3830
    • Identifier Type
      International standard serial number
      Identifier Value
      1939-1560

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    Elser, J. J., Elser, T. J., Carpenter, S. R., & Brock, W. A. (2014). Regime Shift in Fertilizer Commodities Indicates More Turbulence Ahead for Food Security. PLoS ONE, 9(5). doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0093998

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