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The growth rate hypothesis predicts that organisms with higher maximum growth rates will also have higher body percent phosphorus (P) due to the increased demand for ribosomal RNA production needed

The growth rate hypothesis predicts that organisms with higher maximum growth rates will also have higher body percent phosphorus (P) due to the increased demand for ribosomal RNA production needed to sustain rapid growth. However, this hypothesis was formulated for invertebrates growing at the same temperature. Within a biologically relevant temperature range, increased temperatures can lead to more rapid growth, suggesting that organisms in warmer environments might also contain more P per gram of dry mass.

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    Date Created
    • 2017-04-18
    Resource Type
  • Text
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    Identifier
    • Digital object identifier: 10.3389/fenvs.2017.00014
    • Identifier Type
      International standard serial number
      Identifier Value
      2296-665X

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    Moody, E. K., Rugenski, A. T., Sabo, J. L., Turner, B. L., & Elser, J. J. (2017). Does the Growth Rate Hypothesis Apply across Temperatures? Variation in the Growth Rate and Body Phosphorus of Neotropical Benthic Grazers. Frontiers in Environmental Science, 5. doi:10.3389/fenvs.2017.00014

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