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This paper addresses the complex historical/political scenarios of Spanish-speaking people in the Southwestern USA and of Gaelic speakers in the Outer Hebrides. It examines (1) the historical background and current

This paper addresses the complex historical/political scenarios of Spanish-speaking people in the Southwestern USA and of Gaelic speakers in the Outer Hebrides. It examines (1) the historical background and current status of Spanish in the Southwestern USA and Gaelic in the Outer Hebrides; (2) comparative issues in relation to the use of dual languages; and (3) the challenges that communication in more than one prevalent language present to social work service providers.

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Date Created
  • 2013-08-22
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  • Text
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    Identifier
    • Digital object identifier: 10.1080/13691457.2011.618117
    • Identifier Type
      International standard serial number
      Identifier Value
      1369-1457
    • Identifier Type
      International standard serial number
      Identifier Value
      1468-2664
    Note
    • This is an Author's Accepted Manuscript of an article published in the European Journal of Social Work. The final version: Martinez-Brawley, Emilia E., Paz M-B Zorita, and Frank Rennie. "Dual Language Contexts in Social Work Practice: The Gaelic in the Comhairle Nan Eilean Siar Region (Outer Hebrides, Scotland) and Spanish in the Southwestern United States." European Journal of Social Work 16.2 (2013): 187-204. (c) 2013 Taylor & Francis, is available online at: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/13691457.2011.618117, opens in a new window.

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    Martinez-Brawley, Emilia E., Paz M-B Zorita, and Frank Rennie. "Dual Language Contexts in Social Work Practice: The Gaelic in the Comhairle Nan Eilean Siar Region (Outer Hebrides, Scotland) and Spanish in the Southwestern United States." European Journal of Social Work 16.2 (2013): 187-204.

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