Description

In many animals, males bear bright ornamental color patches that may signal both the direct and indirect benefits that a female might accrue from mating with him. Here we test

In many animals, males bear bright ornamental color patches that may signal both the direct and indirect benefits that a female might accrue from mating with him. Here we test whether male coloration in the Pipevine Swallowtail butterfly, Battus philenor, predicts two potential direct benefits for females: brief copulation duration and the quantity of materials the male passes to the female during mating. In this species, males have a bright iridescent blue field on the dorsal hindwing surface, while females have little or no dorsal iridescence.

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Date Created
  • 2013
Resource Type
  • Text
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    Identifier
    • Digital object identifier: 10.1007/s00114-013-1046-1
    • Identifier Type
      International standard serial number
      Identifier Value
      0028-1042
    • Identifier Type
      International standard serial number
      Identifier Value
      1432-1904
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    This is a suggested citation. Consult the appropriate style guide for specific citation guidelines.

    Rajyaguru, P. K., Pegram, K. V., Kingston, A. C. N., & Rutowski, R. L. (2013). Male wing color properties predict the size of nuptial gifts given during mating in the pipevine swallowtail butterfly (battus philenor). Naturwissenschaften, 100(6), 507-513. doi:10.1007/s00114-013-1046-1

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